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Richmond in Fort Bend County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of Thompson's Ferry

 
 
Site of Thompson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 10, 2020
1. Site of Thompson's Ferry Marker
Inscription.  

Where a part of the Mexican Army under command of General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna crossed the Brazos on April 14, 1836 en route to an engagement with the Texans • This occurred one week later at San Jacinto

Erected by the State of Texas
 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 9074.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War, Texas IndependenceWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments series list.
 
Location. 29° 36.013′ N, 95° 47.116′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Texas, in Fort Bend County. Marker is at the intersection of Riverview Drive and Yandell Drive, on the left when traveling north on Riverview Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond TX 77469, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John McNabb (approx. 1.6 miles away); Thomas Jefferson Smith (approx. 1.6 miles away); Walter Moses Burton (approx. 1.6 miles away); H. Schumacher Oil Works
Site of Thompson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 10, 2020
2. Site of Thompson's Ferry Marker
(approx. 1.7 miles away); Morton Cemetery (approx. 1.7 miles away); William Morton (approx. 1.7 miles away); Morton Cemetery 1822 (approx. 1.7 miles away); Site of the Home of Randal Jones (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Regarding Site of Thompson's Ferry. Thompson's Ferry, on the Brazos River between San Felipe and Fort Bend, was operated from 1828 to 1834 by Jesse Thompson. It was important during the Texas Revolution. As Sam Houston's Texan army retreated toward Jared E. Groce's plantation, rear-guard contingents under Moseley Baker at San Felipe and Wyly Martin at Fort Bend sought to prevent the Mexicans from crossing the Brazos River. On April 9, 1836, Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna, not wishing to be delayed by Baker's men at San Felipe, led a column downriver toward Thompson's Ferry. The Mexicans arrived at the crossing on the morning of April 12 and spied a black ferryman on the east bank of the Brazos. Col. Juan N. Almonte, who spoke English well, hailed the ferryman. Probably thinking that this was a countryman who had been left behind during the retreat, the ferryman poled the ferry across to the west bank.
Site of Thompson's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 10, 2020
3. Site of Thompson's Ferry Marker
Santa Anna and his staff, who had been hiding in nearby bushes, sprang out and captured the ferry. By this means the Mexican Centralists accomplished a bloodless crossing of the Brazos, which they completed by April 14. Twelve miles downriver, Martin and the Texans guarding the Fort Bend crossing learned that the Mexicans had crossed in force at Thompson's Ferry; outflanked and outnumbered, they had no choice but to abandon Fort Bend. Baker, also outflanked, was now obliged to end his dogged defense of the San Felipe crossing and join the rest of the Texans in their retreat. José Enrique de la Peña reported that after the battle of San Jacinto, 1,500 Mexican troops and four cannons were stationed at or near Thompson's Ferry under the command of Gen. Vicente Filisola. Peña asserted that if Filisola had force-marched his troops from Thompson's Ferry to San Jacinto, a mere two day's march, he might have undone the effects of the Texan victory. In 1936 the Texas Centennial Commission erected a monument at the ferry site.
Source: "Thompson's Ferry" TSHA Texas State Historical Association - Handbook of Texas
 
Also see . . .
1. Texas Revolution. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on October 24, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Battle of San Jacinto. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on October 24, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
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Credits. This page was last revised on October 24, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 24, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 43 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 24, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 8, 2021