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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Walla Walla in Walla Walla County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Saint Rose Mission

 
 
Saint Rose Mission Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2020
1. Saint Rose Mission Marker
Caption: St. Rose Mission, c. 1900
Inscription.  
The first of three Saint Rose missions in the area was established in 1847 at the confluence of the Yakama and Columbia rivers by Father Eugene Chirouse and was vacated the same year during the Cayuse War. In 1853, Saint Rose of the Cayouse Mission and Cemetery were established several miles southeast of here along Yellowhawk Creek, and that mission was burned in 1855 during the Yakama War. A log chapel was moved to the vicinity of the Frenchtown site in 1863 and a cemetery was established there along the Walla Walla River. In 1876 the river burials were moved to a hill at the Frenchtown site and the Saint Rose of Lima Mission Church was erected on the lower portion of the site, which served the French-Canadian community in the area until about 1900.

St. Rose Mission began during European and American competition to claim the souls and lands of Indians in the Pacific Northwest. At the time, missionaries and governments believed that the formal education of and adoption of Christianity by Indian peoples would result in the assimilation of Indians. Two miles southeast of here, the American Protestant missionaries Marcus and Narcissa
Saint Rose Mission Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2020
2. Saint Rose Mission Marker
Whitman began a mission in 1836. In 1838, Catholic fathers Modeste Demers and Francois Norbert Blanchet were the first Catholic missionaries to pass through this area. They baptised willing local tribal people and employees at Fort Nez Perces.

For his Saint Rose of the Cayouse Mission, Father Eugene Chirouse applied for a donation claim on 160 acres near the confluence of Yellowhawk Creek and the Walla Walla River adjoining the claim of William McBean. Though the Saint Rose claim was not granted, in 1863 William McBain built a log chapel on his land, which was then moved the same year down the Walla Walla River to this vicinity. Around 1870, church services were held in a log school house built near the river in the vicinity of the Frenchtown site. In 1876, the St. Rose of Lima Mission Church was established by Fr. Charles Augustin Richard and a framed church building was erected on the lower portion of the site on land donated by Marcel Gagnon. The church building was removed in 1911, and the wood was used to build a grocery at Ninth & Chestnut in Walla Walla.
 
Erected by Tamastslikt Cultural Institute.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionNative Americans.
 
Location. 46° 3.049′ N, 118° 30.513′ 
Saint Rose Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2020
3. Saint Rose Cemetery
W. Marker is near Walla Walla, Washington, in Walla Walla County. Marker can be reached from Old Highway 12 near U.S. 12. The marker is located at the top of the hill, near the St. Rose Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8174 Old Highway 12, Walla Walla WA 99362, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Local Tribes (here, next to this marker); Frenchtown (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Walla Walla (here, next to this marker); Welcome to the Prince's Cabin (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hudson's Bay Company (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Prince (approx. 0.2 miles away); French-Canadian Cabin Design (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Rose Mission (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Walla Walla.
 
Also see . . .  St. Rose Mission -- Frenchtown Historical Foundation. Consult the lower-half of this site for the article.The St. Rose Mission in the Walla Walla valley was located on three different sites during its existence from l853 to 1911. The mission itself can be taken as an icon representing a clash of cultures. The rivalry between the French and English did not end in l764 with the French and Indian War. St. Rose represents a subtle continuation of this rivalry through the work of the Roman Catholic Church with the Native American population. (Submitted on October 27, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
Additional comments.
Saint Rose Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2020
4. Saint Rose Cemetery
The white obelisk bear the family name of persons buried in the cemetery.

1. Spelling on profile
The spelling on the profile has been taken verbatim from the marker, particularly the spelling of baptised instead of the more standard baptized.
    — Submitted October 27, 2020.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 27, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 46 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 27, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Feb. 25, 2021