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Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Moses Austin

(October 4, 1761 - June 10, 1821)

 
 
Moses Austin Marker image. Click for full size.
By David White, December 20, 2017
1. Moses Austin Marker
This photo shows a renovated marker.
Inscription.  

The initiator of Anglo-American settlement in Texas. Moses Austin was a native of Durham, Connecticut. After his marriage to Mary Brown in 1785, Austin became a leading figure in the development of the American lead industry. His business took him to Virginia and then west to the Mississippi Valley. A colonizer and pioneer as well, Austin helped establish several frontier communities.

Moses Austin’s decision to venture into a colonization enterprise in the Spanish territory of Texas led him to San Antonio de Bexar in 1820. With the help of Felipe Neri, Baron de Bastrop, Austin requested permission from the Spanish Governor, Antonio Martinez, to settle a colony of 300 Anglo-American families in his province. Austin returned to Missouri, where he learned in March 1821 that his petition had been granted. Although ill from the effects of his journey, he began making plans to raise a colony. Three months later, Moses Austin died in the Hazel Run settlement, where he was buried. He was later reinterred in Potosi, Missouri.

In response to his father’s dying wish, Stephen F. Austin continued the colonization project and led
Moses Austin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, August 18, 2007
2. Moses Austin Marker
the first of the “Old 300” colonists into Texas in late 1821.
Texas Sesquicentennial 1836 - 1986
 
Erected 1986 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16141.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 30° 16.76′ N, 97° 44.324′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is on Congress Avenue just south of East 18th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1700 N Congress Avenue, Austin TX 78701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Diocese of Austin (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Swedish Evangelical Free Church (about 500 feet away); Scottish Rite Temple (about 600 feet away); Gethsemane Church (about 600 feet away); Carrington-Covert House (about 700 feet away); Scholz Garten (approx. 0.2 miles away); State Bar of Texas (approx. 0.2 miles away); Statue of Liberty Replica (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Additional comments.
1. Moses Austin and Potosi, Missouri
Moses Austin came to Missouri in 1797 after receiving a 3 square mile Spanish Land Grant, which included a lead mine,
Moses Austin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, February 10, 2014
3. Moses Austin Marker
View of marker in front of the Stephen F. Austin State Office Building
called "Mine a Breton"; opened about 1773 by Francois Azor. Moses was granted by the Spanish Governor the right to colonize, and he brought Missouri's first settlers. This friendship with the Spanish Governor was used as introduction to Tejas (Texas) Governor to request his colonization there.
Here, Moses sank the first mine shaft, he established "Potosi" and established it as the seat of Washington County. Moses also founded Herculaneum (Jefferson County) on the Mississippi river, as a lead depot and shipping point. His son, Stephen F. Austin, grew up in Washington County, was schooled here, developed his views on colonizing new lands, here.
Moses and his wife, Maria, are buried in Potosi's Presbyterian Cemetery. Moses died (1821) soon after the Spanish Governor of Texas granted his petition to settle 300 families there. His son Stephen, now called the "Father of Texas", took up his fathers mantel, creating the "Colony of 300".
    — Submitted June 7, 2010, by James R. Kuntz of Warrenton, Missouri.
 
Moses Austin Marker image. Click for full size.
By David White, December 20, 2017
4. Moses Austin Marker
This photos shows an updated wide-angle view with the building address visible in the background.
Moses and Maria Brown Austin Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By James R. Kuntz, August 29, 2006
5. Moses and Maria Brown Austin Grave Marker
The tomb of Moses Austin and his wife. Located to the rear of the Presbyterian Church of Potosi, Missouri.
Moses and Maria Brown Austin Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By James R. Kuntz, August 29, 2006
6. Moses and Maria Brown Austin Grave Marker
Close up of tomb cover. The original headstones were broken or vandalized, by weather and/or humans, many years ago. This cover was added later to protect the site.
The Presbyterian Church of Potosi, Missouri image. Click for full size.
By James R. Kuntz, August 29, 2006
7. The Presbyterian Church of Potosi, Missouri
Moses Austin is buried near this church.
The Presbyterian Church of Potosi, Missouri image. Click for full size.
By James R. Kuntz, June 6, 2010
8. The Presbyterian Church of Potosi, Missouri
This plaque identifies a church building was built shortly after the deaths of Moses and Maria Brown Austin.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 23, 2010. This page has been viewed 1,399 times since then and 21 times this year. Last updated on October 29, 2020, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. Photos:   1. submitted on February 9, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   2. submitted on January 23, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   3. submitted on February 10, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4. submitted on February 9, 2021, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on June 7, 2010, by James R. Kuntz of Warrenton, Missouri. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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