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Oklahoma City in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Oklahoma City Oil Field

 
 
Oklahoma City Oil Field Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 20, 2015
1. Oklahoma City Oil Field Marker
Inscription.  The Oklahoma City Field is one of the giant fields of the world, having produced more than 735 million barrels of oil and more than 2 trillion cubic feet of gas from 26 producing zones through 1969. The ultimate recovery from this field is estimated to be 770 million barrels.

Geologists first recognized a structure favorable for the accumulation of oil near Oklahoma City in 1917, but it was more than 10 years later that the Indian Territory Illuminating Oil Company (later Cities Service) drilled the discovery well of the Oklahoma City Field. In December 1928, the Itio No. 1 Oklahoma City “blew in” while drilling cement at 6,402 feet. Initial gauge from the Arbuckle dolomite was 6,565 barrels of oil per day.

The reservoirs of this field are in porous sedimentary rock layers that were formed over eons of time by the accumulation of sediments in the seas that once covered this part of Oklahoma. Sedimentary deposition on the Precambrian granite “basement” began about 600 million years ago and continued with a few interruptions for nearly 300 million years, at which time a mountain range was formed by the upward
Marker detail: Pre-Pennsylvanian Geologic Map image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Pre-Pennsylvanian Geologic Map
arching and faulting of the granite. The growth of the range deformed and faulted the overlying rocks, causing those on the west side of the fault to move to a higher elevation than those on the east and elevating the rock layers above sea level. The exposed rocks were then eroded to a relatively flat surface. This erosion surface, called an unconformity, is indicated on the cross section at the right by the wavy line. The map at the left shows the rock distribution on this surface and is, in effect, a geologic map of the area as it was 320 million years ago, before it was again inundated by the sea and covered by several thousand feet of Pennsylvanian and Permian sediments. Later upward movement of the buried mountain range and movement along the fault arched and disrupted these younger rock layers, although to a much lesser degree than the older rocks below the unconformity. All these geologic events produced conditions most favorable for the entrapment of oil and gas.

The pumping well to the left of this sign was directionally drilled so that it is producing oil from directly beneath the Capitol building.
 
Erected by Oklahoma Industrial Development and Park Commission, Oklahoma Geological Survey, and Oklahoma Geologists.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Environment
Marker detail: Structural Cross Section image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Structural Cross Section
Industry & Commerce.
 
Location. 35° 29.457′ N, 97° 30.23′ W. Marker is in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, in Oklahoma County. Marker is at the intersection of Northeast 21st Street and North Lincoln Boulevard, on the right when traveling east on Northeast 21st Street. Marker is located at the northwest corner of the parking lot directly in front of the Capitol. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oklahoma City OK 73105, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. American Elm (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington Elm Tree (within shouting distance of this marker); Tribute to Range Riders (within shouting distance of this marker); Oklahoma Timeline (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Oklahoma City Oil Field (within shouting distance of this marker); Flags Flown Over Oklahoma (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); As Long As The Waters Flow (about 300 feet away); A Past to Remember, A Future to Mold (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oklahoma City.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Oklahoma City Oil Field
 
Also see . . .
1. Oklahoma City Field. One of the most spectacular incidents in Oklahoma
Oklahoma City Oil Field Marker (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 20, 2015
4. Oklahoma City Oil Field Marker (back side)
(Oklahoma Capitol in background)
oil field development occurred when the Mary Sudik Number One, on the south side of Oklahoma City, came in on March 26, 1930. The drilling crew lost control of the well, and it sprayed oil across the countryside for as far as ten miles away until the rig was capped on April 6. Several other major blowouts occurred in the 1930s before operators developed the expertise to control the danger. (Submitted on December 1, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Oklahoma City Oil Field (Wikipedia). The field was the first within an urban area in Oklahoma and caused immediate friction. The Oklahoma City Council passed an ordinance in 1930 to limit drilling to one well per city block. Subsequent legal challenges and flagrant violations of the law led to Governor William H. Murray's declarations of martial law around the wells on May 5 and June 6 of 1932 and March 4, 1933. (Submitted on December 1, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Oil Wells on Oklahoma Capitol Grounds image. Click for full size.
5. Oil Wells on Oklahoma Capitol Grounds
(on exhibit inside Capitol)
Oklahoma Capitol Park image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 20, 2015
6. Oklahoma Capitol Park
(parking ahead for access to Capitol and marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 1, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 1, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 44 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 1, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Mar. 8, 2021