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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Hermleigh in Scurry County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Lone Wolf Community

(5 mi. N of Lone Wolf Mountain)

 
 
Lone Wolf Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 22, 2020
1. Lone Wolf Community Marker
Inscription.  

Named for Kiowa Chief whose tribe roamed area until 1870s. Community developed when John Mahoney donated cemetery and school sites. A schoolhouse, erected 1901, was used also for church services. First teacher. W.F. Knowlton, had 35 pupils. Local post office was Winston (June 26, 1901 - April 30, 1909). Mail later came by rural route. In 1906, D.C. Hazelwood built local store. Lone Wolf school, operated at different locations, served the community until consolidated. Cemetery (with oldest grave dated 1892) continues in use as burial place for area families.
 
Erected 1970 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 3117.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative Americans.
 
Location. 32° 31.903′ N, 100° 44.064′ W. Marker is near Hermleigh, Texas, in Scurry County. Marker is at the intersection of Farm to Market Road 644 and County Highway 4196, on the right when traveling north on Highway 644. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Loraine TX 79532, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
The Lone Wolf Community Marker is located next to the cemetery image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 22, 2020
2. The Lone Wolf Community Marker is located next to the cemetery
13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. D.W. "80 John" Wallace (approx. 10.3 miles away); R.C. (Dick) Ware (approx. 11.4 miles away); Comanche Village Massacre (approx. 11.7 miles away); Ruddick Park (approx. 11.7 miles away); Colorado City Standpipe (approx. 12 miles away); Old D.N. Arnett Home (approx. 12.2 miles away); The First Presbyterian Church (approx. 12.3 miles away); John C. Prude Home (approx. 12.3 miles away).
 
Regarding Lone Wolf Community. Death of a Kiowa Chief - In 1875 upon surrendering with his band, Guipago (Lone Wolf) was among a group of 27 Kiowa singled out by Tene-angopte on order of the U.S. Army for incarceration at Fort Marion in St. Augustine, Florida, where he would remain until 1879. He was found guilty of rebellion and sentenced to confinement in the dungeons of old Fort Marion at St. Augustine, Florida, and vulnerable to malaria and measles. Guipago contracted malaria during his imprisonment at Fort Marion and was sent home in 1879 to live out his days. He died in July 1879. Guipago is buried in the Wichita Mountains in an unknown location, in the Mount Scott area. Source: Wikipedia
 
Also see . . .
1. Lone Wolf - Kiowa Chief. A brief history on the life and times of Lone Wolf from the Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on December 7, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
A wide area view of Lone Wolf Community Marker and Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 22, 2020
3. A wide area view of Lone Wolf Community Marker and Cemetery
 

2. Kiowa Tribe. This link will give more details on the Kiowa's culture and history. (Submitted on December 7, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Gui'pago (Lone Wolf) - Chief of the Kiowa tribe image. Click for full size.
Alexander Gardner - Public Domain, circa 1872
4. Gui'pago (Lone Wolf) - Chief of the Kiowa tribe
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 11, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 7, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 22 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 7, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 25, 2021