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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Yard Evolution: New Power and Production

 
 
Yard Evolution: New Power and Production Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2020
1. Yard Evolution: New Power and Production Marker
Inscription.  Electric power, new rail lines, and travelling cranes of the twentieth century replaced the steam hoists and horse carts of the nineteenth. Thanks to the efficiencies inherent in building multiple ships of identical type-notably the ability to reuse the templates for making the hull components, shipbuilding efficiency soared. Increased use of sub-assemblies allowed work to proceed simultaneously at dispersed lay-down areas and on welding slabs, and to be brought to the slipways as needed.

The yard continued to evolve through World War II, always towards moving the materials through the fabrication process in as straight a line as possible. The most notable change in production was the broad adoption of welding, which replaced riveting in most areas of ship assembly. Welding was easier to teach than riveting and required less strength, which opened up the blue-collar workforce to women during the war. Welding was more efficient and saved weight too.

(first caption:) In this 1904 view of Slip 4, one can see a shed over the slipway in the background-used to prevent delays caused by bad weather. In the foreground,

Yard Evolution: New Power and Production Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2020
2. Yard Evolution: New Power and Production Marker - wide view
The subject marker is the second from the right.
a boiler awaits installation and acres and acres of steel plates will eventually be used to fabricate ships.

(second caption:) This enormous section of deckhouse dwarfs the shipyard workers below as it is lifted by crane to be joined to the ship's hull.

(third caption:) Efficient mass-production of ships required enormous amounts of lay-down space adjacent the slipways. These welding slabs were often used for tracing plywood templates to cut steel plates to shape.
 
Erected 2020 by Union Iron Works Historic District.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 37° 45.774′ N, 122° 23.232′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is at the intersection of Illinois Street and 18th Street on Illinois Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Francisco CA 94107, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Building 49 (here, next to this marker); Crane 14 (within shouting distance of this marker); Ship Propeller Drive Shaft (within shouting distance of this marker); Industrialization of the Shoreline (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Steel Lathe

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(about 400 feet away); Radial Drill Press (about 400 feet away); Peter R. Maloney (4th Street) Bridge (approx. 0.9 miles away); Juan Antonio Marichal Sanchez (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the south side of Building 49 in Crane Cove Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 17, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 54 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 17, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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Mar. 3, 2021