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Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Felipe de Neve, 1728–84

Spanish Governor of the Californias, 1775–82

 
 
Felipe de Neve Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, December 4, 2018
1. Felipe de Neve Marker
Inscription.  In 1781, on the orders of King Carlos III of Spain, Felipe de Neve selected a site near the River Porciuncula and laid out the town of El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles, one of two Spanish pueblos he founded in Alta California.

En 1781, por orden de Carlos III, Rey de España, Felipe de Neve escogió un sitio cerca del río Purcíuncula, donde establecío la población de El Pueblo de la Reina de los Angeles, uno de los dos pueblos expañoles que él fundó en Alta California.

[smaller tablet]
Don Felipe de Neve, founder of El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora La Reina de Los Angeles, September 4, 1781. Erected in commemoration of the 150th anniversary by California Parlor No. 247, Native Daughters of the Golden West. Henry Lion, sculptor.
 
Erected 1932 by California Parlor No. 247, Native Daughters of the Golden West.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraHispanic AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 34° 3.402′ N, 118° 14.337′ 
Felipe de Neve Tablets image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, December 4, 2018
2. Felipe de Neve Tablets
W. Marker is in Los Angeles, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of North Main Street and Paseo Luis Olivares and Paseo de la Plaza. It is in Olvera Street Plaza, with its back to the church across Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Los Angeles CA 90012, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Yangna (a few steps from this marker); Spanish Expeditions Into Southern California (a few steps from this marker); Villavicencio (a few steps from this marker); Christine Sterling (a few steps from this marker); The Original Pueblo of Los Angeles (a few steps from this marker); Plaza Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Vanegas (within shouting distance of this marker); First Mayor of Los Angeles Under United States Rule (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Los Angeles.
 
More about this marker. From the Smithsonian Art Inventories Catalog:
The sculpture, honoring the founder of Los Angeles, cost $10,000. It was commissioned in 1929 by the Native Daughters of the Golden West. Its dedication was scheduled to coincide with the City's 150th anniversary on Sept. 4, 1931; however, because of work delays, it was not dedicated until March 1932. The sculpture was originally located in an 1873 fountain in the center of the Plaza, facing the Plaza Church. The plaza site is where de Neve reportedly stuck his sword into the ground to locate the city. The sculpture was originally controversial, because it was felt the boulder base was too plain, and the statue should have a "proper" pedestal base.

 
Regarding Felipe de Neve, 1728–84. There is no record of what Felipe de Neve looked like, so the sculptor created his own interpretation.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for Felipe de Neve. Excerpt:
In 1781, later in Neve’s tenure, he founded the Pueblo de Los Ángeles. Governor Neve had applied to Viceroy Bucareli for permission to establish a settlement (pueblo) near the Los Angeles River (Río de Porciúncula), where Father Juan
Don Felipe de Neve Sculpture image. Click for full size.
1932 bronze by Henry Lion. Photographed by J.J. Prats, December 4, 2018
3. Don Felipe de Neve Sculpture
1932 bronze by Henry Lion is approx. 7¼ feet tall on a 1½ foot stone base.
Crespí had met local Tongva Indians. With the viceroy’s approval, de Neve was granted authority from The Crown, Charles III of Spain, to found and establish the second pueblo in upper Las Californias, El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula (The Pueblo of Our Lady Queen of the Angels of the Porciúncula River), the present day city of Los Angeles, California.

Neve is credited with being one of the first urban planners because he personally drew the plans for the pueblo. Neve traveled north to inspect the Presidio and mission of San Francisco and the mission of Santa Clara and issued several reports on recent happenings in the Californias and recommendations for establishments, including the recommendation for the site of the city of Los Angeles. “The site had been scheduled for a mission since 1769 when Franciscan Father Juan Crespi first saw it and named it Nuestra Señora de Los Angeles de la Porciuncula for the river on which it was located.” In 1781, Neve issued the “Reglamento para el gobierno de la provincia de Californias” (Regulations for the Government of the Province of the Californias), the first rules regarding governance of secular pueblos like Los Angeles.
(Submitted on December 14, 2020.) 
 
Don Felipe de Neve Sculpture image. Click for full size.
1932 bronze by Henry Lion. Photographed by J.J. Prats, December 4, 2018
4. Don Felipe de Neve Sculpture
1932 bronze by Henry Lion is approx. 7¼ feet tall on a 1½ foot stone base.
Don Felipe de Neve Sculpture Detail image. Click for full size.
Photographed by Bdubay. Via Wikimedia Commons, July 14, 2009
5. Don Felipe de Neve Sculpture Detail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 19, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 14, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 55 times since then and 6 times this year. Last updated on December 17, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 14, 2020, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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