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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near White Rock in Nelson County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Old Mountain Homesite

 
 
Old Mountain Homesite Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 2, 2011
1. Old Mountain Homesite Marker
Inscription.  Much of the Blueridge area was settled in the early 1700s and cleared for agricultural purposes. The land was not economically suited for small farms. These farms were abandoned in the 1860s with the opening of western lands and the Civil War.
George Washington National Forest

 
Erected by U.S. Forest Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 37° 53.857′ N, 79° 2.715′ W. Marker is near White Rock, Virginia, in Nelson County. Marker can be reached from Blue Ridge Parkway (at milepost 18.5). Marker is located on the White Rock Falls Trail, about one mile from the White Rock Gap Parking Area trailhead. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vesuvius VA 24483, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 20-Minute Cliff (approx. half a mile away); Stone Fences (approx. 7.3 miles away); Hurricane Camille (approx. 7.6 miles away); Old Providence Church
Old Mountain Homesite Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 2, 2011
2. Old Mountain Homesite Marker
(approx. 8.3 miles away); New Providence Church (approx. 8.8 miles away); Thomas Massie (approx. 8.8 miles away); a different marker also named Hurricane Camille (approx. 8.8 miles away); Virginia Inventors (approx. 8.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  The Role of the Blue Ridge. In the 1730's-1750's, refugees from religious wars in Europe were able to enter the tolerant Quaker colony at Philadelphia, walk westward through the limestone valleys along modern-day US Route 30, and follow the Great Valley to enter Virginia from the north. That route avoided the climb up and over the mountains. Colonial settlers moved into Virginia counties by walking up the Shenandoah Valley. ("Up the valley" is uphill, from the north to the south.) (Submitted on December 18, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 18, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 18, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Mar. 5, 2021