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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Trenton in Wayne County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon

 
 
Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2020
1. Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon Marker
Inscription.  
Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon
The Michigan Wyandot who fought at Monguagon were neutral at the beginning of the War of 1812. In the years leading up to the war, their villages at Monguagon and Brownstown had not joined the loose coalition led by the Shawnee brothers Tenskwatawa (The Prophet) and Tecumseh in its fight against American expansion onto Indian lands. However, in early August 1812, Tecumseh and Roundhead, his leading Wyandot supporter, convinced the Michigan Wyandot and their head chief, Walk-in-the-Water, to join them and the British. The Anglo-Native alliance was repulsed, but the Wyandot villages continued to block Hull's Trace, the American's supply route from Ohio to Fort Detroit.

Battle of Monguagon
On August 9, 1812, Lieut. Col. James Miller and a force of about 600 American regulars and militia moved down Hull's Trace in an attempt to bring desperately needed supplies from Frenchtown (Monroe) to Detroit. A similar effort had failed at Brownstown on August 5. Near the Wyandot village of Monguagon, American scouts ran into a British and Indian force of about
Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2020
2. Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon Marker
400 men lead by Capt. Adam Muir and Tecumseh. In the heavy fighting that followed, the Americans drove the British back through present-day Trenton and across the Detroit River, while Native forces withdrew into nearby woods. Despite this tactical victory, Miller returned empty-handed to Detroit, which American General William Hull surrendered to the British a week later.
 
Erected 2012 by Michigan Historical Commission-Michigan Historical Center. (Marker Number S199.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWar of 1812. In addition, it is included in the Michigan Historical Commission series list.
 
Location. 42° 7.878′ N, 83° 11.105′ W. Marker is in Trenton, Michigan, in Wayne County. Marker is on West Jefferson Avenue 0.7 miles north of Van Horn Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton MI 48183, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Old Burial Ground (approx. half a mile away); Times of Change (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Rucker-Stanton House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Recording Movements (approx. 2.2 miles away); Rails Through Grosse Ile
Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2020
3. Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon / Battle of Monguagon Marker
View looking to the north. The Elizabeth Park Tourist Lodge is in the background.
(approx. 2.2 miles away); The End of the Line (approx. 2.2 miles away); Michigan Central Railroad (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Livingstone Channel (approx. 2.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced an old marker that was becoming hard to read. The Battle of Monguagon side includes updated and corrected text while the Michigan Wyandot and Monguagon side is new.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  DAR chapter replaces historical marker. Article from the August 19, 2012 Times-Herald about the dedication of the new marker. (Submitted on December 22, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 22, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 22, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. This page has been viewed 34 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 22, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.
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Mar. 3, 2021