Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

St. Paul United Methodist Church

 
 
St. Paul United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
1. St. Paul United Methodist Church Marker
Inscription.  

Organized in 1866, St. Paul United Methodist Church was the first established for African Americans in San Antonio. Its origins were in Paine Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church South, which many of the founding members attended prior to emancipation. In 1866, the Rev. A. Larkin Carper began conducting services in the homes of San Antonio's Black families. Paine Chapel soon deeded him a building and the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church was founded. With the Freedmen's Bureau, members established the Lincoln School African-American students in 1866. Members built a frame building in 1872 on land donated by church member McDaniel Webster; a stone structure replaced it in 1884. The area surrounding church property became known as St. Paul Square. The current sanctuary was completed in 1922.

St. Paul first focused on community work through a Benevolent Society. The congregation also played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in San Antonio. The Rev. Mack Henson became a well-known voice for equality in the late 1800s. Dr. Green J. Starnes and other members continued the work in the early 20th century, focusing on education,
St. Paul United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
2. St. Paul United Methodist Church Marker
health and social justice. In the 1940s, the church established St. Paul House, which provided meeting space and housing for travelers unable to find adequate hotels due to segregation. In 1951, trustees purchased the former Brackenridge Colored School building, which became a community educational complex.

In 1967, the name of the congregation became St. Paul United Methodist Church as a result of the United Methodist merger. Members have continued to aid the needy in the community and have focused on working with children today, St. Paul United Methodist Church remains a vital link to San Antonio's African-American history, while serving as a spiritual leader.

Marker is Property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2010 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16399.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & ReligionCivil Rights.
 
Location. 29° 25.341′ N, 98° 28.48′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is at the intersection of North Mesquite Street and Center Street, on the right when traveling north on North Mesquite Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 508 Center, San Antonio TX 78202, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
St. Paul United Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
3. St. Paul United Methodist Church
. Steam Locomotive No. 794 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Southern Pacific Steam Locomotive No. 794 (approx. ¼ mile away); Southern Pacific Passenger & Freight Station (approx. ¼ mile away); Myra Lillian Davis Hemmings (approx. 0.3 miles away); Lost Burial Place of the Alamo Defenders (approx. 0.3 miles away); John Lang Sinclair (approx. 0.4 miles away); Clara Driscoll (approx. 0.4 miles away); James Nathaniel Fisk (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .
1. Freedmen's Bureau. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, commonly known as the Freedmen's Bureau, was established by Congress in March 1865 as a branch of the United States Army. It was to be a temporary agency. Its functions were to provide relief to the thousands of refugees, Black and White, who had been left homeless by the Civil War; to supervise affairs related to newly freed slaves in the southern states; and to administer all land abandoned by Confederates or confiscated from them during the war.  Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Civil Rights. African Texans have fought for civil rights since their emancipation from slavery in 1865. Organized campaigns, however, were not launched until
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
the early twentieth century. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 22 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 5, 2021