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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Adina Emilia de Zavala

 
 
Adina Emilia de Zavala Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
1. Adina Emilia de Zavala Marker
Inscription.  
Teacher, historian and preservationist Adina Emilia de Zavala was born in Harris County, Texas, on November 28, 1861. She was the daughter of Augustine and Julia Tyrrell de Zavala, and the granddaughter of Lorenzo de Zavala, first Vice-President of the Republic of Texas. Adina spent her early years in Galveston, before moving with her family to a ranch near San Antonio circa 1873.

Miss Adina was a founding member of "De Zavala's Daughters," one of the earliest preservation groups in the state of Texas. Among de Zavala's most renowned contributions to the preservation of Texas history was hre role in saving the Alamo Long Barracks from demolition. De Zavala not only secured funding from philanthropist Clara Driscoll for the purchase of the structure, but she also barricaded herself inside the military quarters in February of 1907 when she feared the building was to be razed. Besides her dedication to saving portions of the Alamo compound, De Zavala initiated a public effort that culminated in protecting several of Texas' most revered historic structures and sites, including the legendary missions and Spanish Governors' Palace in
Adina Emilia de Zavala Marker and gravestone image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
2. Adina Emilia de Zavala Marker and gravestone
Bexar County, and Mission San Francisco de los Tejas in east Texas. In 1938, De Zavala organized the Texas Historical and Landmarks Association. The civic group installed thirty-eight markers at historic sites throughout Texas.

Two months after her death in 1955, the Texas Legislature honored Adina De Zavala for her "life of devotion to Texas history, folklore, and general civic and patriotic work," as well as her commitment to "immortalizing Texas history for the ages."
 
Erected 2008 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15124.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EducationWomen.
 
Location. 29° 25.015′ N, 98° 27.876′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker can be reached from Wyoming Street just east of South Palmetto Street, on the right when traveling east. The marker is located in the Saint Mary's Catholic Cemetery in the northwest section by the cemetery road. . Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1806 Wyoming St, San Antonio TX 78203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Col. Edward Miles (within shouting distance of this marker); The Historic African American Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hamilton P. Bee (approx. 0.2 miles away); John Salmon "Rip" Ford
The Cemetery road by the Adina Emilia de Zavala Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, December 24, 2020
3. The Cemetery road by the Adina Emilia de Zavala Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); D.A. (Jack) Harris (approx. ¼ mile away); Confederate Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); Old Powder Mill (approx. 0.3 miles away); A National Cemetery System (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .  Adina Emilia De Zavala (1861–1955). One of Miss Zavala's greatest contributions to Texas was the preservation of a portion of the old San Antonio de Valero Mission, better known as the Alamo, which her group prevented from being razed in the early twentieth century.  Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 30, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Adina de Zavala image. Click for full size.
Public Domain, circa 1910
4. Adina de Zavala
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 30, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 30 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 30, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 8, 2021