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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Brownsville in Cameron County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Historic Battlefield Trail

 

— Brownsville Hike & Bike Network —

 
Historic Battlefield Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
1. Historic Battlefield Trail Marker
Inscription.  

The Brownsville Historic Battlefield Trail stretches for almost-10 linear miles from the Mitte Cultural District and Southern Linear Park at the southern end to the Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park to the north. The trail also connects to the Resaca de la Palma Battlefield.

The trail is a place for exercise and activity but also provides an opportunity to connect to important cultural opportunities and places of local, regional, and national history.

The Brownsville Historic Battlefield Trail is open 365 days a year. The battlefield sites along the trail and some parking areas for the trail have various hours of operation. Please check closing times for these sites before leaving your car and setting out on the trail.

For emergency assistance, please call 911,

To ensure that all can safely enjoy this trail, users should be alert, courteous, and follow these guidelines.

Stay to your right on the trail, leaving room for others to pass on the left.

Bicyclists should use appropriate speed for traffic and let others know that they are approaching.

Be aware

Historic Battlefield Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
2. Historic Battlefield Trail Marker
of surroundings, if using headphones, keep the volume low enough to hear others around you.

Be especially alert when crossing roadways and respect all traffic signals. If there are small children in your groups, keep them close by your side and away from other traffic on the trail.

Keep pets on short leashes and please pick up after them.

In 1846, soldiers of two countries marched along this route and faced off in the opening battles of the U.S.-Mexican War. That war established the Rio Grande as the border and helped create the city of Brownsville.

Today, the Historic Battlefield Trail provides hike and bike access to the preserved battlefields of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma and links them to Brownsville's museum and cultural district.

Follow in the footsteps of the soldiers of 1846. Enjoy a peaceful way to visit scenes of the region's turbulent history. Hike to battlefields and bike to history.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasWar, Mexican-American.
 
Location. 26° 0.865′ N, 97° 28.861′ W. Marker is in Brownsville, Texas, in Cameron County. Marker is at the

Historic Battlefield Trail Marker, far to the right image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
3. Historic Battlefield Trail Marker, far to the right
intersection of Paredes Line Road (County Highway 1847) and State Highway 550, on the right when traveling north on Paredes Line Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brownsville TX 78526, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Battle of Palo Alto (a few steps from this marker); Palo Alto Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Palo Alto Battlefield (approx. 0.2 miles away); Port of Brownsville (approx. 6.2 miles away); Southern Pacific Railroad Passenger Depot (approx. 7˝ miles away); 1912 Cameron County Jail (approx. 7.6 miles away); a different marker also named 1912 Cameron County Jail (approx. 7.6 miles away); Field-Pacheco Complex (approx. 7.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brownsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 13, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Last updated on January 14, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 13, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 5, 2021