Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Beverly in Randolph County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Battle Of Rich Mountain

Making McClellan's Reputation

 

— The First Campaign —

 
Battle Of Rich Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, November 23, 2018
1. Battle Of Rich Mountain Marker
Inscription.  (preface)
In the spring of 1861, Union forces rushed into northwestern Virginia to secure the vital Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, protect important turnpikes, and support Unionists against Confederates. The two sides fought numerous engagements between June and December. They included Philippi (the war's first land battle), Rich Mountain, Corricks Ford, Cheat Summit Fort, Carnifex Ferry, and Camp Allegheny. The many Union victories made Gen. George B. McClellan's reputation and damaged that of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee—a situation reversed in 1862. Despite later Confederate raids, today's West Virginia remained largely under Federal control for the rest of the war.

(main text)
In one of the first important Union victories of the Civil War, on July 11, 1861, Union Gen. George B. McClellan's forces defeated part of Confederate Gen. Robert S. Garnett's command here at the Hart Farm on Rich Mountain. Garnett was holding the area around Beverly, the junction of two important turnpikes: the Beverly and Fairmont and the Staunton and Parkersburg. Believing that the Rich Mountain defenses were virtually impregnable,

Battle Of Rich Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, November 23, 2018
2. Battle Of Rich Mountain Marker
Garnett had left a small force here under Lt. Col. John Pegram to hold this pass. Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans attacked uphill in a pouring rain and overran the Confederate position. That night, the Confederates abandoned Camp Garnett, their fortification at the western base of the mountain, and fled east through dark woods. Two days later, almost 600 of them surrendered to McClellan in Beverly. Others escaped south, guided by Stonewall Jackson's future mapmaker Jedediah Hotchkiss.

This small but important victory helped secure Union control of Virginia's western counties and contributed to the drive for West Virginia statehood, which was achieved in 1863. It also helped to catapult McClellan to command the Army of the Potomac.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails series list.
 
Location. 38° 51.95′ N, 79° 56.017′ W. Marker is near Beverly, West Virginia, in Randolph County. Marker is on Rich Mountain Road (County Route 37/8) 5 miles west of Seneca Trail (U.S. 250), on the left when traveling west. On the grounds of the Rich Mountain Battlefield. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Beverly WV 26253, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within

Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
walking distance of this marker. General William S. Rosecrans (a few steps from this marker); The Hart House (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Rich Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Rich Mountain / Hart House (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Old Hart House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Stable Yard (within shouting distance of this marker); Rich Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Rich Mountain Battlefield (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Beverly.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 19, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 19, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 8, 2021