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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Custer in Yellowstone County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Buffalo Country

 
 
Buffalo Country Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2020
1. Buffalo Country Marker
Inscription.  Buffalo meant life to the Plains Indians, and the mountain Indians used to slip down from the hills for their share, too. Some tribes would toll buffalo into a concealed corral and then down them; another system was to stampede a herd over a cliff; but the sporting way was to use bows and arrows and ride them down on a trained buffalo horse.
Fat cow was the choice meat. The Indians preserved their meat long before the whites ever had any embalmed beef scandals. They made pemmican by drying and pulverizing the meat, pouring marrow bone grease and oil over it, and packing it away in skin bags. It kept indefinitely, and in food value one pound was worth ten in fresh meat.
Tanned robes and rawhide were used for bedding, tepees, clothes, war shields, stretchers, travois, canoes, and bags. Horn and bones made tools and utensils. The buffalo played a prominent part in many of their religious rites, and jealousy of hereditary hunting grounds brought on most of the intertribal wars.
 
Erected by Montana Department of Transportation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Animals
Buffalo Country Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2020
2. Buffalo Country Marker
Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans.
 
Location. 46° 5.391′ N, 107° 39.601′ W. Marker is near Custer, Montana, in Yellowstone County. Marker is on Interstate 94 at milepost 41, on the right when traveling west. The marker is located in the Custer Rest Area Westbound. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Custer MT 59024, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Great Highway of the Northwest: The Yellowstone Trail (here, next to this marker); Junction of Bighorn and Yellowstone Rivers (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Junction of Bighorn and Yellowstone Rivers (approx. 3 miles away); Crossing the Yellowstone (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Old Time Farm Crime: The Embalmed Beef Scandal of 1898 -- Modern Farmer. They say the beef smelled like an embalmed dead body.... The commander of the Army, Gen. Nelson A. Miles, told a government commission investigating the handling of the war he believed the meat was “defective.”¯... Roosevelt, who had fought in the Spanish-American War before becoming U.S. president, had been forced to eat some of the “embalmed
The Embalmed Beef Scandal image. Click for full size.
By Puck magazine, circa 1906
3. The Embalmed Beef Scandal
beef” and believed it to be tainted.... Roosevelt pushed Congress to act, and in 1906 the Pure Food and Drug Act as well as the Meat Inspection Act became law, forever changing the way America dealt with its food.
(Submitted on January 24, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 25, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 24, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Last updated on January 24, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 24, 2021, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Mar. 5, 2021