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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Takoma in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battleground National Cemetery

Battleground to Community

 

— Brightwood Heritage Trail —

 
Battleground National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 3, 2013
1. Battleground National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
After the rebels were turned back as the Battle of Fort Stevens ended in 1864, scores of Union Soldiers lay cold and silent. Forty-one of them are buried here in this tiny plot dedicated to their sacrifice. President Abraham Lincoln, who observed the battle, spoke at the dedication. At barely one acre, Battleground National Cemetery is one of the nation's smallest.

Memorial Day once drew hundreds to this hallowed place. The holiday was established by veterans in 1868 to honor the Civil War dead. John I. White's grandfather, Lewis Cass White, was a veteran of the battle of Fort Stevens. John later recalled Memorial Day ceremonies here during the early 1900s that attracted veterans from both sides. A military band would play, and crowds listened to patriotic speeches and poems. Students from the Brightwood School placed flowers and American flags on the graves, and artillery men would fire a salute. "Following the ceremonies," White wrote, "the surviving comrades of the Grand Army of the Republic, who traded shots with the Confederates before Fort Stevens, converged ... for a light lunch" on his grandfather's porch
Battleground National Cemetery Marker (reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 3, 2013
2. Battleground National Cemetery Marker (reverse)
"and fought the battle all over again."

Memorials to units that fought in the battle are located at the cemetery's entrance, where two six-pound, smoothbore guns stand guard. The small, rough-hewn sandstone house was built for the cemetery's superintendent and family. General Montgomery Meigs, engineer architect of the Pension Building (now the National Building Museum), and veteran of the Battle of Fort Stevens, created its design.
 
Erected 2008 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 13.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Brightwood Heritage Trail, the Defenses of Washington, and the National Cemeteries series lists.
 
Location. 38° 58.242′ N, 77° 1.626′ W. Marker is in Takoma in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is on Georgia Avenue Northwest (U.S. 29) north of Van Buren Street Northwest, on the right when traveling north. The marker is on the sidewalk in front of Battleground National Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6624 Georgia Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20012, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Battleground National Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); The 25th New York Cavalry
Battleground National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 21, 2021
3. Battleground National Cemetery Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Roll Call (a few steps from this marker); 98th Pennsylvania Infantry (a few steps from this marker); The 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Company K, 150th Ohio National Guard Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Automobiling on The Avenue (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of a Tulip Tree (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Takoma.
 
Also see . . .  Brightwood Heritage Trail information. (Submitted on March 6, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.)
 
Headstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 16, 2008
4. Headstone
41
Edward R. Campbell
VT.
Six-pound gun and New York Cavalry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 13, 2005
5. Six-pound gun and New York Cavalry Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 22, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 6, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 818 times since then and 9 times this year. Last updated on January 26, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 6, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3. submitted on February 21, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4, 5. submitted on March 6, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 26, 2021