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Twentynine Palms in San Bernardino County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Oasis of Mara

 
 
Oasis of Mara Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 18, 2014
1. Oasis of Mara Marker
Inscription.  The life-sustaining waters of the oasis, (which can be seen one half mile to your left) refreshed the nomad Native Americans of our region years before recorded history.

Artist Ron Croci's depiction celebrates the daily life of the Chemehuevi tribe, which was preceded by the Serrano and Cahuilla peoples. The early introduction of U.S. settlers is represented by Colonel Henry Washington, Topographical Branch of the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, and his survey party in 1855.

Today the oasis remains a symbol of the underground waters that nourish 29 Palms.
 
Erected 1995 by Action 29 Palms. (Marker Number 2.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 34° 8.118′ N, 116° 3.15′ W. Marker is in Twentynine Palms, California, in San Bernardino County. Marker is at the intersection of Twentynine Palms Highway (California Route 62) and Palo Verde Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Twentynine Palms Highway. Mural and
Oasis of Mara Mural image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 18, 2014
2. Oasis of Mara Mural
marker cover the east side of the building at this address. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 73777 Twentynine Palms Highway, Twentynine Palms CA 92277, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Desert Trail (approx. 0.2 miles away); Keys' Desert Queen Ranch (approx. ¼ mile away); Jack Cones (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cattle Days in Hidden Valley (approx. 0.3 miles away); Good Times at Smith's Ranch (approx. 0.3 miles away); Flash Flood (approx. 0.4 miles away); Minerva Hamilton Hoyt (approx. one mile away); Champion of the Desert (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Twentynine Palms.
 
More about this marker. Mural Artists: Ron Croci of Honolulu, Hawaii and Robert Caughlan III of San Francisco.
 
Regarding Oasis of Mara. The life-giving waters of this lush palm oasis provided much-needed sustenance for Native Americans and early settlers of the hi-desert, and is still considered the original heart of Twentynine Palms. In this 17 by 80 foot rendering, Cahuilla Indians gather and work in and near the water. A Cahuilla woman offers the exquisite baskets for which the tribe was known, and first surveyor Colonel Henry Washington and his assistant conduct at desert survey.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Oasis of Murals • 29 Palms
 
Also see . . .
1. The Chemehuevi - Native Peoples Of North America. The Chemehuevi are an
Oasis of Mara Mural (<i>right detail</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 18, 2014
3. Oasis of Mara Mural (right detail)
aboriginal people who originated as one of the Southern Paiute tribes. The Chemehuevi traditionally lived in the Mojave Desert in the Great Basin, as well as along the shorelines of the Colorado River. (Submitted on January 29, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. American Indians - Joshua Tree National Park. In 1855 the first survey of the area was made by Colonel Henry Washington who changed the name of the oasis that the natives called Mara, to “Twentynine Palms.” The following year a deputy surveyor reported that "Near the springs the land has the appearance of having been cultivated by the Indians." (Submitted on January 29, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 28, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 29, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Mar. 3, 2021