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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lexington in Rockbridge County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Falling Spring Presbyterian Church

 
 
Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kathy Walker, October 19, 2009
1. Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription.  The oldest congregation in the Fincastle Presbytery, the Falling Spring Presbyterian Church, was organized before 1748. The Hanover Presbytery met here in October, 1780. The present Gothic Revival church was constructed of slave-made brick during the Civil War. At the time of its dedication in April, 1864, General Thomas L. Rosser's Cavalry Brigade was camped here. The first burial in the present cemetery was that of John Grigsby of Fruit Hill (1720-1794).
 
Erected by The National Grigsby Family Society. (Marker Number R-63.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionColonial Era. In addition, it is included in the American Presbyterian and Reformed Historic Sites ⛪ series list. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1864.
 
Location. 37° 41.311′ N, 79° 29.332′ W. Marker is near Lexington, Virginia, in Rockbridge County. Marker is at the intersection of South Lee Highway (U.S. 11) and Falling Springs Road (Virginia Route 680), on the right when
Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kathy Walker, October 19, 2009
2. Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Marker
Looking south on Route 11
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traveling south on South Lee Highway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington VA 24450, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Frank Padget Water Tragedy (approx. 4.3 miles away); Frank Padget (approx. 4.3 miles away); Indian and Settler Conflict (approx. 4.7 miles away); George Washington (approx. 5 miles away); Natural Bridge (approx. 5.1 miles away); a different marker also named Natural Bridge (approx. 5.1 miles away); Monacan Village (approx. 5.1 miles away); Thorn Hill Estate (approx. 5.1 miles away).
 
Regarding Falling Spring Presbyterian Church. Falling Spring Presbyterian Church is one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

Named for a small waterfall that drops into Buffalo Creek, this Rockbridge County was organized in 1748 by Rev. Eliab Byram, a Harvard-educated minister from the Presbytery of New York. The first log building stood one-half mile from the present building. The second building,
Street sign across the road image. Click for full size.
By Kathy Walker, October 19, 2009
3. Street sign across the road
constructed of stone in 1793, had no heating stove, no bell, and brick aisles. In 1859 the trustees contracted with John B. Poague to build the present brick Gothic church about 100 yards west of the demolished 1793 structure. The dedication took place when Montgomery Presbytery met here in 1864. The congregation installed stained glass windows in 1940, renovated the sanctuary in the 1950s, and added an educational building in 1960.


Address for Falling Spring Presbyterian Church is: 410 Falling Spring Road, Glasgow, Virginia.
 
Falling Spring Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 28, 2012
4. Falling Spring Presbyterian Church
Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 15, 2017
5. Falling Spring Presbyterian Church Plaque
Located on church outside the front door.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 3, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 29, 2009, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,578 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on January 30, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 29, 2009, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia.   4. submitted on May 29, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia.   5. submitted on January 30, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 9, 2021