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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Hudson at Work / Life Under the Docks

 
 
The Hudson at Work wayside image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 29, 2020
1. The Hudson at Work wayside
Inscription.  
Side 1: The Hudson at Work

Ship radios here often crackle the message “ Circle Line leaving pier (sic) 83, southbound on the North River.” Are you puzzled? Where is the North River?

Back when New York was the Dutch colony New Amsterdam, the Hudson was called the North River – distinguishing it from the East River and the South River (now the Delaware River). Boat captains here use the Dutch name.

Circle Line boats, ferries to New Jersey, and tugboats with barges are the most common working vessels here. Basic ingredients for city construction projects come down the Hudson; powdered cement in barges and crushed rock in stone scows. Oil and gasoline go up the river in tanker barges.

From around the world, large ships bound as far north as Albany pass this point with oil, molasses, cocoa beans, and gypsum, a mineral used to make sheetrock. Grain and heavy equipment are shipped south out of Albany.

North River or Hudson, the waterway before you is a busy place.

How wide, how deep…?
How wide is the Hudson here?
Approximately three quarters of a mile across
The Hudson at Work side image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 29, 2020
2. The Hudson at Work side
Click or scan to see
this page online
to New Jersey.

How deep is the water?
In the channel the river has an average depth of 50 feet at low tide.

Side 2: Life Under the Docks

The Hudson’s muddy water hides abundant life under Hudson River park piers. But even a good look might live you in the dark. Many of the animals here resemble plants, blobs of jelly, or completely creatures.

Consider the barnacle. Encased in shells, these clam-like creatures are actually cousins of the shrimps and crabs that crawl over the pillars

Shipworms are clams, nor worms. Their shell have evolved into small, sharp wood boring bits that can severely damage wooden docks.

The lined seahorse in common here. With its distinctive head and neck, erect posture, and a prehensile tail for holding onto the pilings, this fish does not look fishy.

Excepting the fish, which of the creatures on the pilings is the closest kin to humans? The answer is the sea squirt, whose appearance gives it another common name – Sea grape. its larva has a primitive backbone and spinal cord in its tail.

Putting a Finger on It

To fully experience the shapes and textures of the creatures living under the piers, upon would need to put on diving gear and take the plunge. That’s not practical for the vast majority of us, so a raised relief panel is offered as a substitute. Trace
Life Under the Docks wayside image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 2, 2019
3. Life Under the Docks wayside
these animals with your fingertips, or use paper and pencil, crayon, or pastels to make rubbings of the organisms shown here.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 40° 43.837′ N, 74° 0.644′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Hudson River Greenway and Leroy Street, on the right when traveling north on Hudson River Greenway. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Hudson River Park, New York NY 10014, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Point Thank You (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Weehawken Street Historic District (approx. 0.2 miles away); Weehawken Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); 304 West 10th Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Archive (approx. 0.2 miles away); Firemen's Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); St. Luke's Chapel (approx. ¼ mile away); 81 Barrow Street (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .  North River (Hudson River). Wikipedia entry (Submitted on February 3, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Life Under the Docks side image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 29, 2020
4. Life Under the Docks side
Putting a Finger on It image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 29, 2020
5. Putting a Finger on It
The traceable glass panel of local riverlife
Pavement panel image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 2, 2019
6. Pavement panel
"The Hudson River Estuary from New York City to Troy"
"Approximately three quarters of a mile across to New Jersey." image. Click for full size.
via Google Earth, 2019
7. "Approximately three quarters of a mile across to New Jersey."
The old Lackawanna Ferry Terminal directly across the river
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 3, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 3, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 58 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on February 3, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.
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Mar. 9, 2021