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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Monterey in Highland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Highland County Confederate Monument

 
 
Highland County Confederate Monument image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
1. Highland County Confederate Monument
Inscription.  (Front):
Erected by
Highland Chapter
United Daughters of
the Confederacy
1918

(Back):
To the
Confederate Soldiers
of
Highland County

A Loving Tribute to
the Past, the Present,
and the Future

 
Erected 1918 by Highland Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy.
 
Topics and series. This memorial monument is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy series list.
 
Location. 38° 24.761′ N, 79° 34.94′ W. Marker is in Monterey, Virginia, in Highland County. Memorial is on High Street (U.S. 250), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Monterey VA 24465, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Walk of Honor (a few steps from this marker); Monterey (a few steps from this marker); The Charles Pinckney Jones Law Office (within shouting distance of this marker); The Charles Pinckney Jones House (within
Highland County Confederate Monument image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
2. Highland County Confederate Monument
Click or scan to see
this page online
shouting distance of this marker); Highland Inn (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Camp Allegheny (approx. 7.1 miles away); Highland County / West Virginia (approx. 7.3 miles away); Highway to War (approx. 7.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Monterey.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Highland County, Virginia Civil War markers.
 
Also see . . .  Smithsonian Institution Research Information System, Confederate Memorial. Condition: Surveyed 1995 July. Well maintained. (Submitted on March 6, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional keywords. Neo-Confederate propaganda, white supremacist propaganda
 
Highland County Confederate Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
3. Highland County Confederate Monument Marker
Highland County Confederate Monument image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
4. Highland County Confederate Monument
Highland County Confederate Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
5. Highland County Confederate Monument Marker
Highland County Confederate Monument Marker, holding the barrel of a World War I style rifle image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1994
6. Highland County Confederate Monument Marker, holding the barrel of a World War I style rifle
(see link ; Smithsonian Institution Research Information System, Confederate Memorial)
Commissioned 1916. 1917. Installed 1918. Dedicated July 4, 1919.
Sculpture: Italian marble; Upper base: Highland (?) granite; Lower base: cement.
Dimensions: Sculpture: approx. H. 13 x W. 3 ft.;
Upper base: approx. H. 13 ft. x W. 3 ft.
Lower base: approx. H. 2 ft.
UDC plaque at entry to the Courthouse grounds where the monument is located image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
7. UDC plaque at entry to the Courthouse grounds where the monument is located
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,031 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   6. submitted on March 6, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7. submitted on March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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Aug. 5, 2021