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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Groesbeck in Limestone County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Fort Parker

 
 
Fort Parker Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 18, 2020
1. Fort Parker Marker
Inscription.  

Built 1834 for protection from Indians. Named for leaders who brought First Predestinarian Baptist Church body to Texas. Elder Daniel Parker, his father, Elder John, brothers Jas. W., Benjamin, Silas, John. Also here were Kellogg, Frost, Nixon, Duty and Plummer families. On May 18, 1836 raiding Comanches killed Benjamin, John and Silas Parker, Samuel and Robert Frost and others; captured Elizabeth Kellogg, Rachel Plummer and son James, and Silas children John and Cynthia Ann. In captivity, Cynthia Ann married Chief Peta Nacona; her son Quanah, was last Comanche Chief. With her baby, Prairie Flower, in 1860 she was captured by Texas Rangers. She, the baby and Quanah are buried at Fort Sill.
Erected as a memorial to the courage and sacrifices of those early settlers by Limestone County Historical Society
 
Erected 1966 by Limestone County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian.
 
Location. 31° 33.846′ N,
The Fort Parker Marker at the front gate. image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 18, 2020
2. The Fort Parker Marker at the front gate.
96° 32.862′ W. Marker is near Groesbeck, Texas, in Limestone County. Memorial can be reached from Park Road 35 ¼ mile south of County Highway 401. The marker is located at the northeast corner of Fort Parker. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Groesbeck TX 76642, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mrs. C.D. Kelly (approx. 1.1 miles away); Fort Parker Memorial Park (approx. 1.1 miles away); Groesbeck Independent School District (approx. 2.2 miles away); Joseph Penn Lynch (approx. 2.2 miles away); Sanders Walker (approx. 2.2 miles away); Old Springfield (approx. 2.3 miles away); Old Springfield Cemetery (approx. 2.3 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps at Fort Parker State Park (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Groesbeck.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Parker.
On May 19, 1836, the fort was attacked by 500 to 700 Caddo and Comanche Indians. Silas was killed, and his nine-year-old daughter, Cynthia Ann, and six-year-old son, John, Mrs. Rachel Plummer and her son James, and Mrs. Elizabeth Kellogg were captured by the Indians.  Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on February 13, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Parker, Cynthia Ann (ca. 1825–ca. 1871).
On May 19, 1836, a large force of Comanche warriors accompanied by Kiowa and Kichai allies
A view of the inside courtyard at Fort Parker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 18, 2020
3. A view of the inside courtyard at Fort Parker
attacked the fort and killed several of its inhabitants. During the raid the Comanches seized five captives, including Cynthia Ann. The other four were eventually released, but Cynthia remained with the Native Americans for almost twenty-five years, forgot Anglo ways, and became thoroughly Comanche. Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on February 13, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
A view of outside Fort Parker by the main gate image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 18, 2020
4. A view of outside Fort Parker by the main gate
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 13, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 13, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 51 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 13, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 5, 2021