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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Kossuth in Auglaize County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Story of this Site

 
 
The Story of this Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 18, 2019
1. The Story of this Site Marker
Inscription.  
Fort Amanda and the surrounding area is built atop a glacial moraine (soil, sand and gravel left behind by glaciers). It is safe to say the area was used throughout prehistory for short- and long-term habitation. During the Archaic Period (8000 BC-500 AD), American Indians, which archaeologists identify today as the Glacial Kame culture, used moraines and other glacial features called kames to bury their dead. Although not associated with the Fort Amanda site, three Glacial Kame cemeteries have been identified within 15 miles of it.

Early 1800s
Historic records show that one of the first civilians in the area was John Chapman-known in folklore as "Johnny Appleseed"-who planted apple orchards throughout the region. There is some speculation he was here prior to the construction of Fort Amanda.

1814
The Treaty of Ghent was signed in 1814, ending the War of 1812 It took four weeks for news to reach Fort Amanda, but within seven days, the fort was deserted. Soon, all of the supply depots that had been critical to the War of 1812 were decommissioned. Some returned to the nature of the

The 1913 Monument image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 18, 2019
2. The 1913 Monument
swamp, but in the case of Fort Amanda, the site has had a long lasting history in the area.

1817
Some of the first settlers arrived around 1817 and used the abandoned fort buildings as their temporary homes. The old fort also served as home for the first religious meting house.

1913
The site was preserved by the Fort Amanda Commission, which sold it to the Sate of Ohio for one dollar It became a State Memorial in 1913. A fifty-foot monument was constructed in 1915 at the cost of $4.500 to mark the site of the fort and honor those who served there.

1934-35
Between 1934 and 1935, the Civilian Conservation Corps, a part of President Franklin Roosevelt's Depression-era New Deal initiative to put the unemployed back to work, improved the site with the construction of the shelterhouse, grill shelter and restrooms that still stand today.

Today
The site remains a place for the community to gather and enjoy nature and the nearby Auglaize River while reflecting on the sacrifice of those who fought in the War of 1812.
 
Erected by Ohio History Connection.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesParks & Recreational Areas

One of the Civilian Conservation Corps improvements image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 18, 2019
3. One of the Civilian Conservation Corps improvements
War of 1812. In addition, it is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) 🏞️, and the Former U.S. Presidents: #32 Franklin D. Roosevelt series lists.
 
Location. 40° 40.964′ N, 84° 16.168′ W. Marker is near Kossuth, Ohio, in Auglaize County. Marker is on Ohio Route 198 0.2 miles south of Deep Cut Road (Local Highway 230), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 22859 OH-198, Spencerville OH 45887, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Story of Fort Amanda (here, next to this marker); The Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); The 77 Unknown Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker); Troops Stationed at Fort Amanda (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Troops Stationed at Fort Amanda (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Troops Stationed at Fort Amanda (about 400 feet away); Strategic Location (about 400 feet away); The Fort: Construction (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kossuth.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 16, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on February 16, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio.   2, 3. submitted on February 17, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 26, 2021