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Near Trenton in Dade County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

White Oak Gap

September, 1863 - The Army of the Cumberland Enters Dade County

 
 
White Oak Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, February 27, 2021
1. White Oak Gap Marker
Inscription.  General James Negley led his 14th Army Corps division of the Federal Army of the Cumberland into Dade County by way of White Oak Gap in early September, 1863. “My division has arrived,” he reported, “and is encamped at Brown's Spring. A sufficiency of water has been obtained by excavating the spring. I inclose you a sketch showing the disposition of the troops, also of the road to this point. The road has been repaired as much as possible, and is passable; the descent of the mountain is, however, very rough, and cannot be remedied. My trains are all up safe, excepting the few wagons sent to the rear for supplies left at Moore's Spring.” Negley led the way over Lookout Mountain by way of Johnson's Crook and on to the battlefield of Chickamauga.

When General William T. Sherman brought a relief army to Chattanooga which was under siege after the battle of Chickamauga, he wanted to deceive the Confederates as to his route. General Hugh Ewing (Sherman's brother-in-law) moved his division against Trenton on November 18, 1863 by way of White Oak Gap. He had been instructed to make a feint toward Trenton and Lookout
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Mountain, while the main Federal force went directly to Chattanooga. General Ewing reported to General Sherman from Trenton: “The head of my column reached here at 10 am. I have camped the rear brigade on the mountain overlooking the town. Cockerill and Corse in town. We threw a few shells at some cavalry [6th Kentucky Cavalry Regiment CSA], who retreated down stream.”

The next day, General Ewing informed Sherman of the disposition of his Brigades. “Loomis built extensive fires on the edge of the mountain last night,” he wrote, “which showed well. Corse camped above town, looking up the valley, and Cockerill below, looking down. … I have sent Corse to take position at the mouth of this gap, fronting upstream and covering his communication, to send one regiment to the top of Lookout, to show its head, and send out pickets, build fires, and demonstrate generally, but with caution; a second regiment to camp half way up. I have ordered Loomis to descend the Raccoon Mountain this afternoon at Wimm's Gap which enters this valley two miles above town, and to stretch out toward Johnson's Crook, camping, with show in fires, &c.,4 or 5 miles above here. Also to build fires at his camp of last night, and on the mountain above Wimms. I have also ordered Corse's last night camp to be lit up. Cockerill this afternoon will move two regiments across Lookout
White Oak Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, February 27, 2021
2. White Oak Gap Marker
Creek.” On November 20, General Ewing issued special orders to destroy the machinery and stacks of all iron-works in Lookout Valley.

A refugee from Dade County provided an account of the destruction to the editor of the Athens Southern Banner. “We hear the following from a gentleman, citizen of Dade County: The Court House and Jail were burned. … Our informant says the town of Trenton is completely demolished."

Captions (left to right)
• General James Negley
• From the map of Col. William E, Merrill, Chief Engineer, Army of the Cumberland.
• General Hugh Ewing
 
Erected by Chickamauga Campaign Heritage Trail and Georgia Civil War Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Chickamauga Campaign Heritage Trail series list. A significant historical month for this entry is September 1863.
 
Location. 34° 52.678′ N, 85° 32.352′ W. Marker is near Trenton, Georgia, in Dade County. Marker is on Georgia Route 301, 0.1 miles north of Phillips Drive, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4601 GA-301, Trenton GA 30752, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trenton (approx. 1.7 miles away); Dade County (approx. 1.8 miles away);
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Union School (approx. 2.1 miles away); The O'Neal House (approx. 2.1 miles away); Macon Iron Works (approx. 2.2 miles away); Payne's (Sitton's) Mill (approx. 2.6 miles away); Stories in Stone (approx. 4˝ miles away); Cole Plantation and Academy (approx. 4.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Trenton.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 28, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 316 times since then and 71 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 28, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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Jul. 16, 2024