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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hernando in DeSoto County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Trade helped the Indians develop ties with Hernando de Soto

 
 
Trade helped the Indians develop times with Hernando de Soto Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 2, 2021
1. Trade helped the Indians develop times with Hernando de Soto Marker
Inscription.  
The Europeans brought beads, metal bells, horses, pigs and a variety of fruits and vegetables to trade with the Southeastern Indians.

Beads and bells were the first items traded here
De Soto offered glass beads and metal bells to tribal leaders during his expedition. The Indians often responded with gifts of fish, maize, or animal skins. Despite this polite exchange, Southeastern Indians were wary of the Spaniards.

What does a bell mean?
When a bell like this is found in the southern United States, it is considered evidence for Indian trade with European expeditions such as that of Hernando de Soto.

Did you know that the Spanish brought horses to the New World?
America's first horses arrived with Spanish explorers in the 1500s. When the Indians saw men on horseback, they thought the man and horse were one creature.

View of marker against side of Desoto County Courthouse. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 2, 2021
2. View of marker against side of Desoto County Courthouse.
Click or scan to see
this page online
that were of European origin, contact with the explorers proved deadly. Entire villages perished after exposure to the diseases.

Food crossed continents in trade with the Indians
These foods originated in the Americas and were taken to the Old World: Avocado, Beans, Cocoa, Corn, Peanuts, Potatoes, Squash, Tomatoes

These foods grew in the Old World and were brought to the Americas: Apples, Broccoli, Coffee, Lemons, Lettuce, Olives, Peaches, Wheat

Spanish pigs became the First Barbecue
Pigs were unknown in America before de Soto arrived here with hundreds of swine intended for food and trade. Southeastern Indians, who liked the tasty pork, smoked the meat over a raised grill that the Spaniards called a "barbacoa"—from which the term barbecue is derived. This culinary exchange is referred to as the "First Barbecue" and it happened right here in Mississippi!

De Soto was the first documented European to see the Mississippi
After two years navigating the Southeast's swamps and forests in search of gold, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto reached the banks of the Mississippi River in 1541. He and his 650 men were the first documented non-Native people to see and cross the great river.

Proof of a Spanish visit?
This Spanish silver medallion was found at the Ingomar Mounds

Engraving of Hernando de Soto (c. 1500 – May 21, 1542) image. Click for full size.
By Public domain
3. Engraving of Hernando de Soto (c. 1500 – May 21, 1542)
site in New Albany, MS. While it suggests a visit by the Spanish explorers, we do not know for sure if de Soto's expedition visited that site.
 
Erected by Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area, National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ExplorationNative Americans. A significant historical year for this entry is 1541.
 
Location. 34° 49.37′ N, 89° 59.676′ W. Marker is in Hernando, Mississippi, in DeSoto County. Marker is on U.S. 51 south of West Commerce Street, on the right when traveling south. Located at the DeSoto County Courthouse. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2535 US-51, Hernando MS 38632, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Historic artwork in this courthouse portrays our regions past (within shouting distance of this marker); Hernando (within shouting distance of this marker); The Dickinson Family (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); "Beale Town Bound" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Baptist Industrial College (approx. 0.4 miles away); Springhill Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away); Colonel Samuel Powel (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hernando Central School (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hernando.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 9, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 41 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 9, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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May. 12, 2021