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Williamsport in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Boys of Williamsport

 
 
The Boys of Williamsport Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 19, 2017
1. The Boys of Williamsport Marker
Inscription.  The town of Williamsport, like many of Maryland's small towns, furnished scores of its citizens for the war effort. The boys of Williamsport served with distinction in many of the states finest units like the 1st MD Cavalry, companies of the Maryland Infantry and the Potomac Home Brigade and participated in the war's largest battles and campaigns. Among the battlefields of Antietam, Gettysburg, Manassas and many others, the roughly 125 boys of Williamsport, clad in both blue and gray, proved their valor. Like other towns across Maryland and across the country, many of these boys paid the ultimate sacrifice for the cause they believed in.

Captain Charles Russell, the "Fighting Parson,” was the town's Presbyterian minister who formed the 1st Maryland Cavalry Company I "Russell's Cavalry" who fought in local battles along with other major engagements. After escaping from Harpers Ferry in September 1862, Russell's Cavalry was tasked with assisting in burning the canal bridge and boats in Williamsport after the battle of Antietam. Many men from his company were local laborers, boatmen, lockkeepers, businessmen, and farmers of Williamsport.

Williamsports
The Mounting Stone image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 19, 2017
2. The Mounting Stone
Located along the curb directly across West Potomac Street from the marker. According to local tradition, on the afternoon of July 13, 1863, Gen. Robert E. Lee stopped outside the Taylor Hotel, dismounted and talked to some locals gathered there. Upon leaving, Lee used a large sandstone block along the sidewalk to mount Traveller. He then rode towards the pontoon bridge at Falling Waters to begin the Confederate retreat across the Potomac.
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Civil War Dead


According to Roger Keller's "Roster of the Civil War Soldiers of Washington County Maryland" second edition

William B. Kennedy
Major Co. A 3rd MD Infantry killed in action at Cedar Mountain 8/9/62

William H. Irwin
1st Lt. Co. I 1st MD Cavalry died of disease 4/9/63

James Anthony
Private Co. I 1st MD Cavalry Killed in action at Brandy Station, VA 6/9/1863

William Atwood
Private Co. A 3rd MD Infantry died at City Point Hospital, VA 4/15/65

Daniel F. T. Castle
Private Co. I 1st MD Cavalry Killed in action at Brandy Station, VA 6/9/63

John E. Farrow
Private Co. I 1st MD Cavalry died 2/24/64

Samuel Fiegley
Private Co. M 1st MD Cavalry died 10/29/64

Daniel C. Hiteshew
Private Co. H. 1st MD Cavalry Mortally wounded at Maryland Heights 9/13/62

Samuel W. Long
Private Co. I 1st MD Cavalry killed in action at Deep Bottom, VA 8/16/64

Alfred Smith
Private Co. I 1st MD Cavalry killed in action at Deep Bottom, VA 8/16/64

James Stillwell
Private Co. I 1st MD Cavalry died 3/2/63

(captions)
Ruben L. Bowers enlisted with the Potomac Home brigade and was discharged with the 13th Maryland Infantry Company H. Photo courtesy of Sue Hoch

Drawing
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by Edwin Forbes depicts fighting at Brandy Station Virginia where Russell's Cavalry fought fiercely and many Williamsporters were killed and wounded. Courtesy of the Library of Congress

The boys of Williamsport served in several of Maryland's finest units including the Third Maryland Union Volunteer Infantry. Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Sergeant William G. Parker, a painter from Williamsport who fought with Russell's 1st MD Cavalry Co. I. He was wounded at Deep Bottom, VA Courtesy of the Williamsport Town Museum
 
Erected by The Baltimore Bookworks LLC, Maryland Heritage Area and Hagerstown and Washington County Maryland.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 36.024′ N, 77° 49.289′ W. Marker is in Williamsport, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of West Potomac Street (U.S. 11) and North Conococheague Street (Maryland Route 63), on the right when traveling east on West Potomac Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Williamsport MD 21795, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Murder of Dewitt Clinton Rench (Rentch) (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Hospitals in Williamsport (about 400 feet away); Joseph Lewis Lemen, Jr.
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(about 500 feet away); The Wagon Train of the Wounded and Williamsport (approx. 0.2 miles away); The John Brown Bell (approx. 0.2 miles away); Band Stand (approx. 0.2 miles away); Doubleday Hill (approx. 0.2 miles away); River View Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Williamsport.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 10, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 26 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 10, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide shot of marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?

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May. 14, 2021