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Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Legacy of Emancipation Park

 
 
The Legacy of Emancipation Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 16, 2021
1. The Legacy of Emancipation Park Marker
Inscription.  

Emancipation Park was acquired in 1872 by previously enslaved African Americans who were in unanimous support of purchasing their own land on which to celebrate Juneteenth and to use for community development and cultural enrichment. Rev. Jack Yates (1828-1897) of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church, Rev. Elias Dibble (1811-1885) of Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, Richard Brock (1824-1906) of St. Paul A.M.E. Church and Richard Allen (1831-1909), civic leader and elected official, served as the core leadership. It took the whole village and area churches using effective community organization skills, business acumen and political savvy to help raise money.

The Colored People of Harris County Festival Association was formed and trustees Richard Brock, Richard Allen, Daniel Riley, John Graham, Taylor Burke, Frank Keeland, Johnson Rice, John Sessums and Tillman Bush purchased this 10-acre site just outside the city limits for $800. The Colored Emancipation Park Association was formed in 1883 and later both groups continued to be active in the management of the park for decades.

Emancipation Park was the only space
The Legacy of Emancipation Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 16, 2021
2. The Legacy of Emancipation Park Marker
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open to African Americans until 1940 and many influential organizations and institutions worked with board management to plan celebrations which included picnics, concerts, carnivals, industrial and agricultural fairs, proms, military drills, dances, sporting events, movies, classes for youth and adults, and community meetings. The park's significance to the Houston African-American community remains as impactful today as it was in 1872. Emancipation Park is a true legacy of Texas African-American heritage and a gift to humanity for all generations.
 
Erected 2017 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 14937.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansParks & Recreational Areas. A significant historical year for this entry is 1872.
 
Location. 29° 44.131′ N, 95° 21.864′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is at the intersection of Emancipation Avenue and Elgin Street, on the right when traveling south on Emancipation Avenue. The marker is located at the front of Emancipation Park by the Cultural Center building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3018 Emancipation Avenue, Houston TX 77004, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Reverend David Elias Dibble (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Reverend John Henry "Jack" Yates (about 400
The view of the Legacy of Emancipation Park Marker from the street image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 16, 2021
3. The view of the Legacy of Emancipation Park Marker from the street
feet away); Richard Allen (about 600 feet away); Richard Brock (about 700 feet away); Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church (about 700 feet away); Sixth Church of Christ, Scientist (about 700 feet away); Jordan Grove Missionary Baptist Church (about 800 feet away); St. John Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 18, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 18, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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May. 14, 2021