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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Dr. Benjamin Jesse Covington and the Covington House

 
 
Dr. Benjamin Jesse Covington and the Covington House Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 16, 2021
1. Dr. Benjamin Jesse Covington and the Covington House Marker
Inscription.  

Dr. Benjamin Jesse Covington (c.1871-1961), his wife Jennie Belle Murphy (1881-1966), and the stately home they built here in 1911 represented a level of achievement, dignity, and civic service matched by few African Americans in Houston during the first half of the 20th century.

Born and reared on a farm in Falls County, Texas, Dr. Covington exhibited surgical skills on farm animals at an early age. He later attended Hearne Academy and Meharry Medical College to become a surgeon. After graduating in 1900 he began his medical practice in Wharton, Texas. He married Gonzales native Jennie Belle Murphy in 1902, and in 1903 they moved to Houston where Dr. Covington practiced medicine for 58 years.

Dr. Covington, president of the Lone Star Medical Association in 1920, co-founded the Houston Negro Hospital in 1925. Mrs. Covington co-founded the Blue Triangle Branch, Y.W.C.A., and served as chair of the Texas State Commission on race relations. The Covingtons were active members of Antioch Baptist Church.

During a period when local hotels were segregated, the Covingtons' home (razed in 1978) served as Houston's
The view of the Dr. Benjamin Jesse Covington and the Covington House Marker from the corner image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, April 16, 2021
2. The view of the Dr. Benjamin Jesse Covington and the Covington House Marker from the corner
The Wesley Chapel AME Church is in the background
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unofficial guest quarters for many prominent African American visitors including Booker T. Washington and eminent artists Marian Anderson and Roland Hayes.
 
Erected 1994 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 10642.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansScience & Medicine. A significant historical year for this entry is 1911.
 
Location. 29° 44.404′ N, 95° 21.625′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is at the intersection of Emancipation Avenue and Hadley Street, on the right when traveling north on Emancipation Avenue. The marker is located at the corner of the street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2219 Emancipation Avenue, Houston TX 77003, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Grand Court Order of Calanthe of Texas (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Trinity East United Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fourth Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. John Missionary Baptist Church (approx. ¼ mile away); Reverend David Elias Dibble (approx. 0.3 miles away); Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Richard Allen (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 18, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 18, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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May. 14, 2021