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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

A Moment in Time

 
 
A Moment in Time Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
1. A Moment in Time Marker
Inscription.  Running as fast as the mustang pony could run, Pony Express riders raced across nearly 1900 miles of wilderness carrying the U.S. Mail between St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California. With nostrils flaring, lungs gasping for air, and muscles burning every ounce of energy the pony could muster, horse and rider climbed over mountains, crossed dry deserts, and forded rivers and streams through cold of winter, heat of summer, and threat of life—setting a delivery record unsurpassed by anything else in the early 1860s. The legend of the “pony,” a race against time and a test of extreme endurance, quickly found a place in the hearts and emotions of Americans that still lives today.

Carefully study the genius of the Avard Fairbanks’ Pony Express Monument. Fairbanks sculpture is a study in contrasts that captures a moment in history while symbolizing the interdependency of generations - the rider depending on the station keeper to be there for him as the younger generation depends on the older one and the older generations bidding farewell to the younger—an interdependence uniting young and old, and man and
Reconstructed barn and corral image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
2. Reconstructed barn and corral
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beast.

Dr. Fairbanks believes that great sculpture comprises the mastery of four elements—anatomy, action, balance, and rhythm. He used these to contrast the vigor of the fresh horse versus the fatigue of the spent horse, the excitement of the youthful rider charging off (his foot barely in the stirrup) versus the solidarity of the old station keeper who kept the horse waiting and bids “Godspeed” to the rider as he gallops away.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Events. In addition, it is included in the Pony Express National Historic Trail 🐎 series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1900.
 
Location. 40° 45.137′ N, 111° 49.198′ W. Marker is in Salt Lake City, Utah, in Salt Lake County. Marker can be reached from Sunnyside Avenue. It is located in “This is the Place” Heritage Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2601 Sunnyside Avenue, Salt Lake City UT 84108, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Unsung Heroes (within shouting distance of this marker); In Ten Days or Less... (within shouting distance of this marker); Pony Express Goes to the Olympics (within shouting distance of this marker); Learn About The Pony Express (within shouting distance of this marker); Sesquicentennial Mormon Trail Wagontrain
Pony Express Monument, by Avard Fairbanks image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
3. Pony Express Monument, by Avard Fairbanks
Avard T. Fairbanks (1897–1987) created this life-sized work in plaster over wood and wire in 1947 for a parade float. In 1998 it was replicated in bronze by Robert Shure.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); This is the Place Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pioneer Pavilion (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pine Valley Chapel (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salt Lake City.
 
Additional keywords. Pony Express
 
The National Pony Express Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Rezac, May 15, 2010
4. The National Pony Express Monument Marker
The National Pony Express Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Rezac
5. The National Pony Express Monument Marker
Rider Reminiscences image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
6. Rider Reminiscences
"My run on that record-breaking ride was 57 miles. We did not have stations then change our horses. I had to make it with just one horse and I made the run in mighty good time considering the distance, but I killed the poor horse doing it. He was so stiff the next morning we couldn't get him out of the stable." George Washington Perkins
Rider Reminiscences image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
7. Rider Reminiscences
"Relays were ten to twenty miles apart. The horses were always ready and often the change from one horse to another was made in less than a minute. At some places I was given a canvas bag of food which I ate as I rode." Frank H. Gould
Rider Reminiscences image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
8. Rider Reminiscences
"I took the Express from Ruby Valley, Nevada to Salt Lake City, a distance of 300 miles in 34 hours, using six horses and two mules. Several stations were burned on the road and several animals stolen ... in November, 1860 I carried the Presidential election returns west over 75 miles ... The news was carried 1,966 miles from St. Joe, Missouri to San Francisco in less than eight days, the fastest time ever made by the Pony Express." William Frederick Fisher
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 21, 2021. It was originally submitted on June 28, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 5,656 times since then and 171 times this year. Last updated on April 19, 2021, by Connor Olson of Lemmon, South Dakota. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 28, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on May 17, 2010, by John Rezac of Salt Lake City, Utah.   6, 7, 8. submitted on June 28, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A clear, close-up photo of the marker. • Can you help?

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May. 17, 2021