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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Norfork in Baxter County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Jacob Wolf House

Visitors Over the Years

 
 
Marker is located in the far left rear of the property. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 3, 2021
1. Marker is located in the far left rear of the property.
New interpretive markers are expected to replace these 20 year old markers in 2022.
Inscription.  
Wolf Family Home
Even after the county seat moved, this house bustled with activity. Arkansas became a state in 1836, and settlers followed the White River hundreds of miles into the interior of north Arkansas. Thousands of these settlers passed by here. Some stopped and traded, while others just stopped to rest. As a result, Jacob Wolf's store and blacksmith shop prospered. A post office also continued here until the Civil War.

As a family home, the Wolf House saw many children born and raised to adulthood here. Children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews were also married here. As a deacon of the Baptist Church, Wolf hosted camp meetings and denominational gatherings on the hillsides surrounding his home. A. C. Jeffery, writing about the early settlement period of Izard County, states that Wolf had "perhaps the largest household of kindred and friends of any man on White River." Jacob Wolf died in this house January 1, 1863 at the age of 77.

Keelboats
Keelboats were a common site on the White River during the early settlement years. They ranged in size from 40 to 75 feet long and from eight

Marker is just to left of photo in the distance. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 3, 2021
2. Marker is just to left of photo in the distance.
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to 12 feet wide. They were used by merchants like Jacob Wolf to transport trade goods and by settlers coming to claim land in Arkansas.

This view of the Wolf House focuses on what was originally considered the front of the structure. I faced the White River where people arrived by canoe, keelboat and, later, steamboats. Jacob Wolf's oldest son was the captain of the first steamboat that arrived here in 1834. Wolf established a terry across the river, and the original landing site can still be seen on the opposite side.

The circuit court sessions that met here at the courthouse several times a year drew people from all over the county. Sessions lasted for several days, sometimes for more than a week. Families camped oil over the grounds. They bought or bartered for goods they needed back home. Men had competitions of skill in shooting, wrestling and tomahawk tosses.

That the Wolf house is at this location is no accident. It sat across the river from the Shawnee villages in the Cherokee Reservation and at the head of steamboat navigation. Upstream from the Wolf House, the White and North Fork Rivers were navigable in canoes and sometimes keelboats when the river was high. Also converging here were overland routes connecting the headwater country of the Buffalo River to Batesville and points beyond.

Prehistoric Occupations
Archaeology has revealed

The Jacob Wolf House. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 3, 2021
3. The Jacob Wolf House.
that this upland terrace site was used over and over again by small groups of people for many thousands of years. The unplowed portion of the ground under the house produced layered concentrations of projectile point flakes and artifacts. Projectile points are frequently referred to as arrowheads. The different styles of projectile points found under the house show that many thousands of years separated the groups of people who lived here.

Projectile points were found from 10 to 30 centimeters below the surface of the ground. The scale at the right shows the depth that each projectile point was found.
 
Erected by Arkansas Humanities Council; Department of Arkansas Heritage.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Settlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels. A significant historical date for this entry is January 1, 1863.
 
Location. 36° 12.621′ N, 92° 17.234′ W. Marker is in Norfork, Arkansas, in Baxter County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Arkansas Route 5 and Wolf Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13775 Highway 5, Norfork AR 72658, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jacob Wolf House Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Jacob Wolf House (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker

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also named Jacob Wolf House (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Military Road (approx. 5.9 miles away); Skirmishes Near Mountain Home (approx. 10.2 miles away); Mountain Home Commercial Historic District (approx. 10.2 miles away); City Hall (approx. 10.3 miles away); Military Activity at Calico Rock / Bushwhackers (approx. 10.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Norfork.
 
Regarding Jacob Wolf House. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 22, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 21, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 21, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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May. 13, 2021