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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

All Angels’ Church

Seneca Village Community

 
 
All Angels’ Church wayside image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
1. All Angels’ Church wayside
Inscription.  
Those aware of Seneca Village have speculated as to whether the stones visible in the lawn just beyond this sign are the remains of a building foundation from the Village. In fact, they are remnants of a sandbox that was installed in the 1930s. Coincidently, they mark the approximate location of All Angels’ Church, one of the three churches in the heart of Seneca Village.

Unlike the other Seneca Village Churches, which were branches of African-American churches located in downtown Manhattan, All Angels’ was created as a result of missionary efforts by a local church. St. Michael’s, an Episcopal church located at Amsterdam Avenue and 99th Street, first established a Sunday School in the area in 1833 and in 1849 built the church to serve the community. Both African Americans and European immigrants attended services and were baptized, married, and buried by the church.
 
Erected 2020 by Central Park Conservancy.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansParks & Recreational AreasSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1833.
 
Location.
All Angels’ Church site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
2. All Angels’ Church site
Like most Seneca Village sites, there are no physical remains or representations to be had. Some of the stone border of the 1930s sandbox is just visible.
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40° 47.044′ N, 73° 58.138′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached from West 85th Street east of Central Park West. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Central Park, New York NY 10024, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Wilson House (a few steps from this marker); Searching for Seneca Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Seneca Village Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Seneca Village Landscape (within shouting distance of this marker); Seneca Village (within shouting distance of this marker); African Union Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Irish Americans (within shouting distance of this marker); AME Zion Church (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .
1. Seneca Village. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on April 22, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

2. Seneca Village Site. Central Park Conservancy website entry:
Links to several related sub-topics (Submitted on April 22, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

3. Seneca Village, New York City. National Park Service entry (Submitted on April 22, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
3. Inset
All Angels’ recorded all baptisms, marriages, and burials. These baptisms of children indicated as “colored” took place in 1850. Frederick Riddles, top, lived in Seneca Village; we do not know if the Thompson Children, bottom, lived in the village.
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
4. Inset
When the city built Central Park, church leaders moved the building from Seneca Village to 11th Avenue between 80th and 81st Streets. Pictured here is All Angels’ Church in its second location. This is the only known photograph of a building that existed in Seneca Village.
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
5. Inset
All Angels’ Church was the largest of the three churches in Seneca Village. Unlike the other buildings in the village that were aligned with the street grid, this church was oriented to true east-west, perhaps for religious reasons or because its site was constrained by underlying bedrock.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 26, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 22, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 22, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.

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May. 12, 2021