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Cumberland in Guernsey County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Cumberland

Horse Dealing and Stealing

 

— John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail —

 
Cumberland Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 10, 2021
1. Cumberland Marker
Inscription.  Around 3 pm on the afternoon of July 23, 1863, Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan and about 600 Confederate raiders entered Cumberland. Morgan and a handful of his officers found respite at the Globe House. Others entered the home of a Dr. Stone.

Some of Morgan’s men went to Stone’s barn, intending to steal the doctor’s horse. When the doctor protested and adamantly claimed he needed the horse to visit housebound patients, the raiders offered to not take it in exchange for $75. The doctor paid and kept his horse. The horse, alas, was taken by later raiders who came through Cumberland.

Inviting themselves as dinner guests, the Confederates requested and received home-cooked meals. Meanwhile, Morgan’s men acquired fresh horses from the Cumberland area, along with cash and goods from the Holmes and Colonel Squire stores.

A Cumberland man was ordered to guide the raiders to Point Pleasant (now Pleasant City), where he was released. The innkeeper, Harrison Secrest, became the next unwilling guide for the Confederate raiders. Passing through Hartford (now Buffalo), Morgan’s troops burned bridge across the Seneca branch
Cumberland Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 10, 2021
2. Cumberland Marker
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of Willis Creek and proceeded to Senecaville.

(sidebar)
A Friendly Fire Victim. Stragglers from Morgan’s command came through Point Pleasant for several hours. While resting, a few raiders saw a single rider approaching. The rider failed to respond when challenged, and they shot him. He turned out to be John Happs, one of their own soldiers who had fallen asleep in the saddle. The Confederates were forced to leave their friendly fire victim behind, where a local Christian family reluctantly nursed Happs back to health.
 
Erected by Ohio Civil War Trails, Civil War 150 Ohio, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 39.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is July 23, 1863.
 
Location. 39° 51.251′ N, 81° 39.413′ W. Marker is in Cumberland, Ohio, in Guernsey County. Marker is on North Cambridge Street (Ohio Route 146) 0.1 miles north of Main Street (Ohio Route 340), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 359 N Cambridge St, Cumberland OH 43732, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Lett Settlement (approx. 4.3 miles away); U.S.S. Shenandoah (approx. 4˝ miles away); Crash of the USS Shenandoah / Lighter-Than-Air Flight
Cumberland Marker at the Old School image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 10, 2021
3. Cumberland Marker at the Old School
(approx. 4.7 miles away); a different marker also named U.S.S. Shenandoah (approx. 6.4 miles away); Wreckage Site Number 1 of the U.S. Navy Airship Shenandoah (approx. 6.4 miles away); Claude L. Wilson (approx. 7.1 miles away); Wreck of the Shenandoah (approx. 7.7 miles away); Wreckage Site Number 3 of the U.S. Navy Airship Shenandoah (approx. 8˝ miles away).
 
More about this marker. This interpretive panel has three illustrations captioned as follows: “Morgan and some of his officers enjoyed a quick meal inside the Globe House.” “Dr. Stone, who operated the Globe House in Cumberland, convinced some raiders to take $75 cash instead of his horse. The agreement, however, meant nothing to subsequent raiders who took the animal anyway.” “When a lone raider, who was asleep in the saddle, approached Point Pleasant, Confederates fired on him only to realize he was one of their own men.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 26, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 26, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 25 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 26, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

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May. 15, 2021