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Detroit in Wayne County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The War of 1812 in Detroit / War of 1812 Grave Site

 
 
The War of 1812 in Detroit/ War of 1812 Grave Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 3, 2021
1. The War of 1812 in Detroit/ War of 1812 Grave Site Marker
Side 1
Inscription.  
The War of 1812 in Detroit
On June 18, 1812, the United States Congress declared war on Great Britain. William Hull, Michigan’s first territorial governor, was selected to lead the U.S. army at Detroit. He invaded Canada on July 12, but soon lost battles south of Detroit and withdrew. On August 16, 1812, the British attacked Fort Detroit. Hull surrendered. Britain governed the city under martial law until Oliver Hazard Perry gained control of the upper Great Lakes in September 1813. American forces returned to Detroit and launched a successful invasion of Canada. The citizens of Detroit lived in an uneasy peace until they learned, on February 20, 1815, of the December 24, 1814, signing of the Treaty of Ghent. On March 29 they celebrated the war’s end with a “Grand Pacification Ball.”

War of 1812 Grave Site
In reaction to Oliver Hazard Perry’s Lake Erie victory, the British withdrew from Detroit on September 26, 1813, setting fire to the buildings within the fort and the Citadel. Three days later, United States troops returned to a city that lacked housing and food supplies.
The War of 1812 in Detroit/ War of 1812 Grave Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 3, 2021
2. The War of 1812 in Detroit/ War of 1812 Grave Site Marker
Side 2
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A disease, probably cholera, broke out among the soldiers. By December 1, 1813, an estimated 1,300 of them were ill. The medical supplies were soon depleted; conditions worsened. When coffins became unobtainable, many soldiers were buried in a common grave at this site. Some 700 may have died before the epidemic finally ran its course. This grave site was identified in 1987 during an archaeological survey for the People Mover that found four burials associated with the War of 1812.
 
Erected 2019 by Michigan Historical Commission - Michigan History Center. (Marker Number S0242.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & SettlersWar of 1812. In addition, it is included in the Michigan Historical Commission series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1812.
 
Location. 42° 19.928′ N, 83° 3.054′ W. Marker is in Detroit, Michigan, in Wayne County. Marker is on Washington Boulevard north of Michigan Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Located in the median just north of the Alexander Macomb monument. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Detroit MI 48226, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chicago Road (within shouting distance of this marker); General Casimir Pulaski (within shouting distance of this marker);
The War of 1812 in Detroit/ War of 1812 Grave Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 3, 2021
3. The War of 1812 in Detroit/ War of 1812 Grave Site Marker
Marker seen with The Westing Book Cadillac Detroit hotel in background.
Michigan's First Capitol/Capitol Union School (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The First Capitol Building in Michigan (about 500 feet away); Finney Barn (about 500 feet away); Detroit's Underground Railway Station (about 600 feet away); Woodward Avenue Cultural Heritage Tour (approx. 0.2 miles away); Comerica Incorporated (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Detroit.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaces marker number 21745, with the same Michigan site number and has been moved 200 feet NNE from its former location.
 
Also see . . .  The War of 1812: Bombs over Detroit. Excerpt:
In a way, it’s good that almost nobody knows much about the War of 1812. Detroit played a significant role, and it was not the city’s finest hour.
(Submitted on May 4, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 4, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 4, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 4, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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May. 6, 2021