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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Detroit in Wayne County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Pewabic Pottery / Mary Chase Perry Stratton

 
 
Pewabic Pottery Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 5, 2021
1. Pewabic Pottery Marker
Inscription.  
Pewabic Pottery
In 1903 Mary Chase Perry (Stratton) and Horace Caulkins founded Pewabic Pottery in a stable near downtown Detroit. Four years later, the present building was constructed – a pottery works designed in the style of an English inn. Pewabic Pottery was part of the early twentieth-century Arts and Crafts design movement, which shunned machine-made products and championed the return of craftsmanship. Pewabic’s handmade ceramic wares became famous nationwide for their quality and brilliant, iridescent glazes. The company’s architectural tiles were used in numerous public and private buildings, including Detroit’s Guardian Building and the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. Pewabic Pottery is a National Historic Landmark.

Mary Chase Perry Stratton
Mary Chase Perry was born in 1867 in Hancock, Michigan. By age ten she had moved to Detroit. She studied china painting and sculpture at the Cincinnati Art Academy from 1888 to 1890. In 1903 Perry co-founded a pottery in Detroit and named it “Pewabic” after the Upper Peninsula copper mine
Mary Chase Perry Stratton Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 5, 2021
2. Mary Chase Perry Stratton Marker
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near Hancock. She later married architect William B. Stratton, who designed the Pewabic Pottery building. During her prolific career, Perry developed new, iridescent pottery glazes, taught and wrote widely about ceramics, and was awarded honorary degrees from the University of Michigan and Wayne State University. She died in 1961 at age ninety-four. Pewabic Pottery celebrated its centennial in 2003.
 
Erected 2009 by Michigan Historical Commission - Michigan Historical Center. (Marker Number S0716.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicIndustry & CommerceWomen. In addition, it is included in the Michigan Historical Commission series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1903.
 
Location. 42° 21.711′ N, 82° 58.894′ W. Marker is in Detroit, Michigan, in Wayne County. Marker is at the intersection of East Jefferson Avenue and Hurlbut Street, on the right when traveling south on East Jefferson Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10125 E Jefferson Ave, Detroit MI 48214, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ossian Sweet House / Dr. Ossian Sweet (approx. 0.6 miles away); Indian Village (approx. 0.8 miles away); Eastern Liggett School / Detroit Waldorf School (approx. 0.8 miles
Pewabic Pottery / Mary Chase Perry Stratton Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 5, 2021
3. Pewabic Pottery / Mary Chase Perry Stratton Marker
away); Police Radio Dispatch (approx. 1˝ miles away); Alpheus S. Williams (approx. 1.6 miles away); Detroit Spanish American War Monument (approx. 1.6 miles away); Ransom Eli Olds (approx. 1.8 miles away); Gen. O. M. Poe Post No. 433 (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Detroit.
 
Also see . . .  About Pewabic Pottery. We believe our first hundred years were only the beginning. (Submitted on May 5, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan.) 
 
Pewabic Pottery NRHP Marker image. Click for full size.
By J.T. Lambrou, May 5, 2021
4. Pewabic Pottery NRHP Marker
Added to National Register of Historic Places on September 3, 1971.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 5, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 5, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 18, 2021