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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tallahassee in Leon County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Integration Statue

 
 
The Integration Statue Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
1. The Integration Statue Marker
Inscription.  The Integration Statue stands as a celebration of hardships and successes of a group of young men and women with a vision to make FSU a center of learning for all people. It was designed to recognize the many brave young idealists who fought for equality in education and in all aspects of life during turbulent times.

Though the doctrine of "separate but equal" in public education was overturned in 1954, integration in Florida's postsecondary institutions did not immediately follow. In the summer of 1962, without the prompting of litigation, FSU broke barriers by admitting its first African American students — 12 teachers enrolled in graduate science courses. That fall, FSU enrolled its first three full-time African American students — two graduate students and one undergraduate.

In 1965, the undergraduate student, Maxwell Courtney, became the first African American graduate of FSU. Enrolling at FSU in 1965, Fred Flowers became the first African American to wear an FSU athletic uniform. In 1970, FSU students elected the first African American Homecoming Queen, Doby Lee Flowers. With those students and so many others in mind, sculptor Sandy

The Integration Statue Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
2. The Integration Statue Marker
Marker is on top of pedestal. Statue is on Legacy Walk, beyond right side of image.
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Proctor has said that his concept for the monument was "books, bats and beauty."

The prominent placement of this monument ensures that the students of today and tomorrow are reminded of the journey their fellow FSU alumni undertook in demanding social, academic and athletic equality. As Fred Flowers said at the unveiling of this monument, "Florida State University stands alone as a shining light, as a beacon of diversity and multiculturalism.”

• • •
[text from related plaques mounted around base of sculpture]

"Integration"
W. Stanley "Sandy" Proctor (USA)
Bronze, 2003

This artwork is a celebration of the hardships and successes of a group of young men and women with a vision. That vision was to make Florida State University a center of learning for all people — a great university with cultural diversity as part of its mission. This sculpture honors those courageous African-American students who paved the way to integration at Florida State University during the 1960s. The three figures are historically accurate representations of the first African-American graduating scholar from the Class of 1965, the first African-American to wear an FSU athletic uniform and the first African-American Homecoming Princess.
 
Erected 2004 by Florida State University.
 
Topics. This

Maxwell Courtney Statue image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
3. Maxwell Courtney Statue
First African-American undergraduate student.
historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsEducationWomen. A significant historical year for this entry is 1965.
 
Location. 30° 26.623′ N, 84° 17.877′ W. Marker is in Tallahassee, Florida, in Leon County. Marker can be reached from North Woodward Avenue 0.2 miles south of West Tennessee Street (U.S. 90) when traveling south. Marker and "Integration" sculpture are located on the Florida State University Legacy Walk, just south of North Woodward Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tallahassee FL 32304, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dr. J. Stanley Marshall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Honoring Student Excellence (about 300 feet away); Konrad Emil Bloch (approx. 0.4 miles away); John Robert Schrieffer (approx. 0.4 miles away); Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (approx. 0.4 miles away); Sir Harold W. Kroto (approx. 0.4 miles away); Robert Sanderson Mulliken (approx. 0.4 miles away); James M. Buchanan (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tallahassee.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Story Behind the Statue: Honoring the Firsts of Florida State
Maxwell Courtney image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
4. Maxwell Courtney
(plaques in front of statue)

1962-1965 (BA)
First African-American undergraduate student
admitted to Florida State University


April 19, 2012
To celebrate 50 years of integration and diversity, a human chain of hundreds passed, hand to hand, a bronze disk from this statue of Maxwell Courtney to a commemorative pyramid on Westcott Plaza.
. In 1962, nearly a decade after the landmark Supreme court case Brown v. Board of Education, Florida State University officially changed its admittance policy and opened its doors to African American students. In 2002, on the anniversary of this pivotal moment, the sitting University President Talbot D’Alemberte commissioned this commemorative monument. (Submitted on May 24, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Integration Statue. The monument, titled “Integration,” was unveiled during the Heritage Day Celebration on January 30, 2004. The monument consists of three figures standing approximately nine feet tall on a circular brick pedestal, and is based on the concept of “books, bats, and beauty.” The first African American students at FSU faced a multitude of challenges in the efforts of integration of the university. The students worked for integration in all aspects of campus life, including academic, athletic, and social. The planners of the monument, including D’Alemberte, Doby Flowers, Proctor, and FSU officials, decided that the “books” element of the monument theme was best represented by Courtney, the first African American graduate; the “bats” element was best represented by Fred Flowers, the first African American athlete; and the “beauty” element was best represented
Fred H. Flowers Statue image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
5. Fred H. Flowers Statue
First African-American to wear an FSU athletic uniform
by Doby Flowers, for the significant social achievement of becoming the first African American Homecoming Queen. (Submitted on May 24, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Fred H. Flowers image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
6. Fred H. Flowers
(plaques in front of statue)

1965-1969 (BA); 1973 (MS)
First African-American to wear an FSU athletic uniform


April 19, 2012
To celebrate 50 years of integration and diversity, a human chain of hundreds passed, hand to hand, a bronze disk from this statue of Fred Flowers to a commemorative pyramid at the gateway to the Science Quadrangle.
Doby Lee Flowers Statue image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
7. Doby Lee Flowers Statue
First African-American Homecoming Princess
Doby Lee Flowers image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
8. Doby Lee Flowers
(plaques in front of statue)

1967-1971 (BS); 1973 (MS)
First African-American Homecoming Princess
Crowned 1970


April 19, 2012
To celebrate 50 years of integration and diversity, a human chain of hundreds passed, hand to hand, a bronze disk from this statue of Doby Flowers to a commemorative pyramid on the Student Legacy Walk.
FSU 50th Anniversary of Integration<br>April 12, 2012 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 2, 2021
9. FSU 50th Anniversary of Integration
April 12, 2012
(located along the Legacy Walk, near the College of Medicine)

Starting at the Integration Statue, this disk passed hand to hand along a human chain of hundreds and was set into this pyramid to symbolize the broad reach of diversity across campus.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 27, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 24, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on May 24, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Jun. 18, 2021