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New Johnsonville in Humphreys County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Horse Corral

 
 
The Horse Corral Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, July 10, 2021
1. The Horse Corral Marker
Inscription.  Johnsonville's Union supply depot included a six-acre horse corral. The corral was located directly to your front and left on what was at the time the bank of the Tennessee River.

The photograph on the right, taken in November 1864, clearly shows the horse corral visible to the rear. The corral's perimeter wall appears to be wooden slabs that are nailed in a vertical position and re-enforced by horizontal planks. The gate to the corral is visible in the center. Aside from being shipped to Nashville, horses in this holding area were used to pull field artillery. In the foreground are men from the 2nd U.S. Colored Light Artillery. Saddles and other tack are stacked atop limbers. A limber is a two-wheeled cart that supported the trail of an artillery piece. The daily routine of watering, feeding, and grooming horses and mules was a common activity for teamsters, artillerymen and cavalry throughout the Civil War.

The ground between the wharf and the store house is piled six feet deep with sacks of oats and bails of hay. A little to the right of the store is a corral in which there is some 1000 horses and mules. One of the boats at

The Horse Corral Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, July 10, 2021
2. The Horse Corral Marker
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the wharf was loaded with horses.

Corporal Lorenzo D. Atwood
43rd Wisconsin Infantry
at Johnsonville, 1864

(sidebar)
Today's Tennessee River
In 1944, the Tennessee Valley Authority flooded the Tennessee River to bring hydro-electric power to millions of people in Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Alabama. Today, the site where the horse corral was located in 1864 is submerged beneath the waters of Kentucky Lake.

(caption)
Several 12-pound Napoleon guns are still attached to limbers

 
Erected by Tennessee State Parks.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansAnimalsWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 36° 3.78′ N, 87° 57.926′ W. Marker is in New Johnsonville, Tennessee, in Humphreys County. Marker is on Old Johnsonville Road near Museum Road, on the right when traveling west. Located in Johnsonville State Historic Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Museum Rd, New Johnsonville TN 37134, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Forrest's Opening Move (within shouting distance of this marker); Forrest Shells the Depot (within shouting distance of this marker); The Final Tally (within shouting distance of

The location of the horse corral is underwater in this area. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, July 10, 2021
3. The location of the horse corral is underwater in this area.
this marker); Artillery at Johnsonville (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Union Supply Depot (about 300 feet away); The Tennessee River in the Civil War (about 300 feet away); Winfrey Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Lower Redoubt (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Johnsonville.
 
Also see . . .  Johnsonville State Historic Park. (Submitted on July 15, 2021.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 14, 2021, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. This page has been viewed 76 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 14, 2021, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Dec. 8, 2022