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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Guyandotte in Cabell County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Historic Carroll House

 
 
Historic Carroll House Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 23, 2021
1. Historic Carroll House Marker
Inscription.  First located in Gallipolis, Ohio, the house, owned by James Gallaher. was floated down the Ohio River to Guyandotte in 1810. Obtained by the Carroll family, it was used as an inn and site for Catholic Mass. On November l1, 1861, Mary Carroll saved the home from being burned by Union troops. The house was owned by Madie Carroll when it was added to the National Register in 1973.
 
Erected 2019 by West Virginia Archives & History.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionLandmarksWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Archives and History series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1810.
 
Location. 38° 25.725′ N, 82° 23.417′ W. Marker is in Guyandotte, West Virginia, in Cabell County. Marker is on Guyan Street north of 5th Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 234 Guyan St, Huntington WV 25702, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Granville Parker (here, next to this marker); Madie Carroll House
Historic Carroll House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 23, 2021
2. Historic Carroll House and Marker
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(here, next to this marker); Battle of Guyandotte (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Guyandotte (within shouting distance of this marker); Raid on Guyandotte / Burning of Guyandotte (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Cabell County Court House (about 600 feet away); John S. Witcher (approx. 0.2 miles away); Guyandotte (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
Regarding Historic Carroll House. It is owned and operated by the Madie Carroll House Preservation Society. It is open to the public as a museum. Inquire locally for hours of operation.
 
Also see . . .
1. Madie Carroll House. Excerpt:
A local piano teacher and community leader, Madie Carroll willed the historic home to her nephew, Lewis Carroll. The house became the Historic Madie Carroll House in 1973 when it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Carroll family deeded the house to the Greater Huntington Park and Recreation District in 1984, and it is now being restored by the Madie Carroll House Preservation Society, Inc.
(Submitted on July 28, 2021.) 

2. Madie Carroll House. 2020 article
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by Amanda Vaughan in Clio: Your Guide to History. Excerpt:
Mary Carroll, who continued to run the inn herself after Thomas’s death, was credited with saving the house from destruction during the Battle of Guyandotte. On November 10, 1861, a Confederate force attacked a Union recruit camp at Guyandotte, but the Confederates quickly overcame the federal troops. On the morning of November 11, newly-arrived Union troops set fire to much of the town in retaliation for the strong Confederate sympathies held by many of Guyandotte’s residents. During the battle, Mary Carroll barricaded herself and her family inside the house and refused demands from Union troops to leave. Eventually the soldiers gave up and burned the family’s barn instead. In 1892, Mary successfully petitioned the federal government for reimbursement for the loss of property due to the fires.
(Submitted on July 28, 2021.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 28, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 28, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

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Dec. 1, 2021