Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mims in Brevard County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Voting Rights Act

Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park

 
 
Voting Rights Act Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
1. Voting Rights Act Marker
Inscription.  

Voting Rights Act, U.S. legislation (August 6, 1965) that aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the Fifteenth Amendment (1870 )to the Constitution of the United States. The act significantly widened the franchise and is considered among the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in U.S. history.

Shortly following the American Civil War (1861-1865), the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified, guaranteeing that the right to vote would not be denied “on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Soon afterward the U.S. Congress enacted legislation that made it a federal crime to interfere with an individual’s right to vote and that otherwise protected the rights promised to former slaves under both the Fourteenth (1868) and Fifteenth amendments. In some states of the former Confederacy, African Americans became a majority or near majority of the eligible voting population, and African American candidates ran and were elected to office at all levels of government.

Nevertheless, there was strong
Voting Rights Act Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
2. Voting Rights Act Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
opposition to the extension of the franchise to African Americans. Following the end of Reconstruction in 1877, the Supreme Court of the United States limited voting protections under federal legislation, and intimidation and fraud were employed by white leaders to reduce voter registration and turnout among African Americans to vote, but such legislation was only partially successful. In 1964 the Civil Rights Act was passed and the twenty-fourth Amendment, abolishing poll taxes for federal offices, was ratified, and the following year Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson called for the implementation of comprehensive federal legislation to protect voting rights. The resulting act, the Voting Rights Act, suspended literacy test, provided for federal approval of proposed changes to the voting laws or procedures (“preclearance”) in jurisdictions that previously used tests to determine voter eligibility (these areas were covered under Sections 4 and 5 of the legislation), and directed the attorney general of the United States to challenge the use of poll taxes for state and local elections. An expansion of the law in the 1970s also protected voting rights for non-English-speaking U.S. citizens. Sections 4 and 5 were extended for 5 years in 1970, 7 years in 1975, and 25 years in both 1982 and 2006.
 
Erected by Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil Rights. A significant historical date for this entry is August 6, 1965.
 
Location. 28° 39.226′ N, 80° 50.674′ W. Marker is in Mims, Florida, in Brevard County. Marker can be reached from Freedom Avenue, 0.3 miles Parker Street, on the left when traveling south. The marker is located within the Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park and Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2180 Freedom Avenue, Titusville FL 32796, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. March On Washington (a few steps from this marker); Freedom Riders (a few steps from this marker); Rosa Parks (within shouting distance of this marker); National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (within shouting distance of this marker); Groveland Four (within shouting distance of this marker); Harry Tyson Moore (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown v. Board of Education (within shouting distance of this marker); Little Rock Nine (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mims.
 
Also see . . .  1965 Voting Rights Act. (Submitted on July 31, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 5, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 31, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 86 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 31, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=178361

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
Paid Advertisements
 
 

Feb. 1, 2023