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Mims in Brevard County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Ocoee Race Riots - 1920

[Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park]

 
 
Ocoee Race Riots - 1920 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
1. Ocoee Race Riots - 1920 Marker
Inscription.  
The Ocoee massacre was a violent race riot that broke out on November 2, 1920, the day of the quadrennial U.S. Presidential election in Ocoee, Florida, African-American-owned buildings and residences in northern Ocoee were burned to the ground, and as many as 50 or 60 African Americans were killed throughout the conflict. The African-Americans residing in Ocoee who were not direct victims of the race riot were later driven out by threats or force. Ocoee would then become an all-white town and remain as such until sixty-one years later in 1981. The riot is still considered the single bloodiest day in modern American political history.

The race riot was started as a white mob’s response to the persistence of Mose Norman, an African American, to vote on Election Day. Mose Norman was ordered and driven away when he first attempted to go to the polls. When he came back to the polls later he was driven away again by whites, who would later form a mob to search for him. The white mob then surrounded the home of Julius “July” Perry, a prosperous local African-American farmer and contractor, where it was believed Norman was taking refuge.
Ocoee Race Riots - 1920 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
2. Ocoee Race Riots - 1920 Marker
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After Perry drove away the white mob with gunshots, the mob called for reinforcements from Orlando and Orange County, who then laid waste to the African-American community in Ocoee and eventually killed Perry. Norman would escape, never to be found. Other African Americans would flee into the orange groves, swamps and neighboring towns, leaving behind their homes and possessions.
 
Erected by Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsNotable Events. A significant historical date for this entry is November 2, 1920.
 
Location. 28° 39.268′ N, 80° 50.785′ W. Marker is in Mims, Florida, in Brevard County. Marker can be reached from Freedom Avenue, 0.3 miles south of Parker Street, on the right when traveling south. The marker stands on the grounds of the Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park and Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2180 Freedom Ave, Mims FL 32754, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Medgar Evers (a few steps from this marker); Thurgood Marshall (a few steps from this marker); Mitchelville, South Carolina (a few steps from this marker); 99th Fighter Squadron (within shouting distance of this marker); James, General Daniel “Chappie”, Jr. (1920–1978)
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(within shouting distance of this marker); Greensboro Sit-Ins (within shouting distance of this marker); Juneteenth (within shouting distance of this marker); Virgil D. Hawkins – April 1949 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mims.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ocoee Massacre. (Submitted on August 1, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
2. Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park. (Submitted on August 1, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
 
Additional keywords. Acts of Terrorism; domestic terrorism; Jim Crow South
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 7, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 1, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 66 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 1, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Jan. 19, 2022