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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Raymond in Hinds County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Field Artillery

 
 
Field Artillery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 30, 2021
1. Field Artillery Marker
Inscription.  Civil War field artillery was organized in batteries, and while six guns were considered the ideal number, four gun batteries were common, especially in the Confederate service. A captain commanded the battery, and lieutenants were in charge of two-gun sections. A gun and caisson, along with two limbers, made up a platoon under a sergeant and two corporals. The sergeant was the “chief of the piece" and often served as the gunner. A gun crew, in addition to the gunner, consisted of seven artillerymen who were assigned numbers for servicing the gun. Typically, four men worked the gun under the sergeant's, or gunner's, supervision. No. 5 was positioned [betwen] the gun and the limber, which was parked a minimum of six yards behind the gun, depending upon the terrain. Nos. 6 and 7 were stationed at the limber.

On giving the command "Load," the gunner also called out the type of round and time setting for the fuse. While No. 1 swabbed the tube to extinguish any burning embers from the previous round, Nos. 6 and 7 selected the round, set the fuse, and inserted it into the round. The round was given to No. 5, who
Field Artillery Marker among 12 replica guns. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 30, 2021
2. Field Artillery Marker among 12 replica guns.
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ran it to No. 2 at the gun for insertion into the tube. No. 1 then rammed the charge down the tube while No. 3 thumbed the vent. The gunner aimed the piece by turning the elevating screw, which raised or lowered the tube, and by adjusting deflection, done by shifting the trail of the gun to the left or right. On the command “Ready," No. 4 inserted the friction primer, or ignition device, which was attached to a 14 foot-long lanyard. Both 3 and 4 then stepped outside the wheels. The lanyard was jerked on the command "Fire," which sent a flash down the vent into the tube and discharged the gun. A well-trained crew could fire the gun in less than a minute.

Inset
Artillery regulations prescribed 14-yard intervals between guns. A gun was 2 yards wide; thus, a 6-gun battery front totaled 82 yards. However, combat spacing was dependent upon the tactical situation and the lay of the land.
 
Erected 2016 by the Friends of Raymond Battlefield.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 32° 14.317′ N, 90° 26.865′ W. Marker is near Raymond, Mississippi, in Hinds County. Marker can be reached from Mississippi Route 18, 1.2 miles south of Old Port Gibson Road, on the right when traveling south. Located
Line of 12 replica artillery at Raymond Battlefield. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 30, 2021
3. Line of 12 replica artillery at Raymond Battlefield.
on Raymond Military Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Raymond MS 39154, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle Plans (here, next to this marker); U.S. Second Brigade; (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Battery D, 1st Illinois Light Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. 11th Battery, Ohio Light Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Seventh Division; (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); U.S. 8th Battery, Michigan Light Artillery (about 400 feet away); U.S. First Brigade; (about 500 feet away); U.S. 3d Battery, Ohio Light Artillery (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Raymond.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on Field artillery in the American Civil War. (Submitted on August 2, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 2, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 2, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 2, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Dec. 1, 2021