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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mukilteo in Snohomish County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Permission to come ashore

gʷəɬaɬliləxʷ ɬi siʔiʔab

 
 
Permission to come ashore Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 1, 2021
1. Permission to come ashore Marker
Inscription.  
"When you're on the water, you know that you're celebrating your ancestors and taking care of your spirit"
-Tulalip tribal member, Sydney Napeahl.

Cedar canoes are the traditional mode of transportation for Coastal Native American people and for thousands of years, canoes played a key role in their survival. The waterways of the Salish Sea have been their highways and trading routes.

Each summer the local tribes continue this tradition with the Canoe Journey. The tribes take turns hosting the events in which thousands of native people paddle in traditional cedar canoes from tribe to tribe until reaching their final landing destination. When tribes reach the territory of another tribe, they request permission to come ashore. After all the canoes have arrived, they begin a weeklong celebration of singing, dancing, and passing their ancestral teachings on to the next generations. The Canoe Journey allows tribal members to participate in their history, origins, values, and lifeways.
 
Erected by Washington State Department of Transportation.
 
Topics. This historical marker
Permission to come ashore Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 1, 2021
2. Permission to come ashore Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 47° 56.993′ N, 122° 17.892′ W. Marker is in Mukilteo, Washington, in Snohomish County. Marker is on the Mukilteo Ferry Terminal grounds. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mukilteo WA 98275, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Salmon People (a few steps from this marker); The Orca People (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Mukilteo (approx. 0.3 miles away); Treaty of Point Elliott (approx. 0.4 miles away); Tradition of Carving (approx. 0.4 miles away); Point Elliott Treaty (approx. 0.4 miles away); Commemorating Signing Point Elliott Treaty (approx. 0.4 miles away); Native Americans (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mukilteo.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Tulalip Tribes: Who We Are. Website homepage (Submitted on August 11, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 

2. Northwest Coast Canoes. Simon Frasier University, The Bill Reid Centre website entry (Submitted on August 11, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 

3. Tribal Canoe Journeys. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on August 11, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
"An inside look at the Canoe Journey protocol" by Kalvin Valdillez (2019). image. Click for more information.
via LRInspire, 2019
3. "An inside look at the Canoe Journey protocol" by Kalvin Valdillez (2019).
LRInspire website entry
Click for more information.
 

4. Coast Salish Canoes Lesson Plan. Watcom County Library System website entry (Submitted on August 11, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 10, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 11, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 11, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on October 10, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.

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Dec. 1, 2021