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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Dominican Sisters

Congregation of the Sacred Heart

 
 
Dominican Sisters Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
1. Dominican Sisters Marker
Inscription.  At the request of Galveston Bishop Nicholas Aloysius Gallagher, Dominican Sister Mary Agnes and Mother Rose Lynch left their Sacred Heart Convent in Somerset, Ohio, to staff a school in Galveston in 1882. Twenty sisters including Sister Agnes and Mother Rose arrived in Galveston on September 29, 1882. Horse-drawn carriages brought them from the railroad station to a 2-story home here owned by St. Mary's Cathedral. They established a convent and opened Sacred Heart Academy on October 9, 1882.

Mother Agnes died in 1891 and was succeeded in the office of Superior of Sacred Heart by Mother Pauline Gannon. Severe damage to the Sacred Heart Convent in the storm of 1900 eventually resulted in its relocation to the Adoue Home at 16th and Postoffice in 1927. A new Sacred Heart Academy, known as the Dominican High School was built at the corner of Postoffice and 15th in 1940. A school for girls operated there until 1968, when the house was leased to O'Connell High School, created by a merger of the Kirwin High School for Boys and the Ursuline and Dominican School for Girls. The Dominican Sisters moved to a new convent in 1974. They presently
Dominican Sisters Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
2. Dominican Sisters Marker
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serve numerous dioceses and arch dioceses in Texas, California, and Guatemala.
 
Erected 1993 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 7432.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & ReligionEducationWomen. A significant historical date for this entry is September 29, 1882.
 
Location. 29° 18.447′ N, 94° 47.138′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of Market Street and 16th Street, on the right when traveling east on Market Street. The marker is located at the northwest corner of the building by the street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1525 Market Street, Galveston TX 77550, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Washington Grover House (within shouting distance of this marker); Landes-McDonough House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Victor Gustafson Home (about 400 feet away); The Wilbur Cherry House (about 600 feet away); Mathilda Wehmeyer German-American Kindergarten School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Galveston Immigration Stations (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jacobs Home (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jean Lafitte (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Also see . . .  Dominican Sisters.
The view of the Dominican Sisters Marker from across the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
3. The view of the Dominican Sisters Marker from across the street
At Bishop Gallagher's request they opened Holy Rosary School, a free institution for black children in Galveston, in 1887, and antagonism towards them increased. Parents of the academy children threatened to withdraw their children unless the nuns closed Holy Rosary. The sisters refused, and both Holy Rosary and Sacred Heart Academy prospered. In 1893 the Dominicans opened a free school for the children of the cathedral parish. Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 22, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 76 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jul. 2, 2022