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Mims in Brevard County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Juneteenth

Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park

 
 
Juneteenth Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
1. Juneteenth Marker
Inscription.  Juneteenth (short for “June Nineteenth”) marks the day when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas in 1865 to take control of the state and ensure that all enslaved people be freed. The troops’ arrival came a full two and a half years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Juneteenth honors the end of slavery in the United States and is considered the longest-running African American holiday.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee had surrendered at Appomattox Court House two months earlier in Virginia, but slavery had remained relatively unaffected in Texas—until U.S. General Gordon Granger stood on Texas soil and read General Orders No. 3: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” The Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, had established that all enslaved people in Confederate states in rebellion against the Union “shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” But in reality, the Emancipation Proclamation didn’t instantly free any enslaved people. The proclamation only applied in
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places under Confederate control and not to slave-holding border states or rebel areas already under Union control. However, as Northern troops advanced into the Confederate South, many enslaved people fled behind Union lines.

In Texas, slavery continued as the state experienced no large-scale fighting or significant presence of Union troops. Many enslavers from outside the Lone Star State had moved there, as they viewed it as a safe haven for slavery. After the war came to a close in the spring of 1865, General Granger’s arrival in Galveston that June signaled freedom for Texas’s 250,000 enslaved people. Although emancipation didn’t happen overnight for everyone—in some cases, enslavers withheld the information until after harvest season—celebrations broke out among newly freed Black people, and Juneteenth was born. That December, slavery in America was formally abolished with the adoption of the 13th Amendment.

The year following 1865, freedmen in Texas organized the first of what became the annual celebration of “Jubilee Day” on June 19. In the ensuing decades, Juneteenth commemorations featured music, barbeques, prayer services and other activities, and as Black people migrated from Texas to other parts of the country the Juneteenth tradition spread.

In 1979, Texas became the first state to make Juneteenth an official holiday. Today, 47 states
Juneteenth Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
2. Juneteenth Marker
recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday, while efforts to make it a national holiday have so far stalled in Congress.
 
Erected by Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsWar, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is June 19, 1865.
 
Location. 28° 39.243′ N, 80° 50.785′ W. Marker is in Mims, Florida, in Brevard County. Marker can be reached from Freedom Avenue, 0.3 miles south of Parker Street, on the right when traveling south. Located within the Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park and Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2180 Freedom Avenue, Mims FL 32754, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Virgil D. Hawkins – April 1949 (a few steps from this marker); 99th Fighter Squadron (a few steps from this marker); Emmet Till (within shouting distance of this marker); Medgar Evers (within shouting distance of this marker); Eatonville (within shouting distance of this marker); Thurgood Marshall (within shouting distance of this marker); Ocoee Race Riots - 1920 (within shouting distance of this marker); Rosewood Massacre - 1921 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mims.
 
Also see . . .
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 Juneteenth History. Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (Submitted on August 26, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 26, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 314 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 26, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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May. 29, 2024