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Clarkston in Oakland County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Getting Here

Transportation in Independence Township

 
 
Getting Here Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 26, 2021
1. Getting Here Marker
Inscription.  The Saginaw Trail was once a footpath through this wooded region, used by Native Americans. In the 1820s, the trail became the first road in the region for travel from Pontiac through the southwest corner of Independence Township and on to Saginaw. It was vital to the settlement and growth of the area, and came to be called Dixie Highway. When the first railroad and depot were built nearby in the 1850s, Depot Road became the main link to Clarkston for mail, shipping and travelers. As automobiles became common in the early 1900s, paved roads gave drivers better access to the attractive businesses, homes, and recreation of Independence Township.
 
Erected by Independence Township Safety Path.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1820.
 
Location. 42° 43.512′ N, 83° 25.727′ W. Marker is in Clarkston, Michigan, in Oakland County. Marker is at the intersection of Dixie Highway (U.S. 24) and White Lake Road, on the right when traveling west on
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Dixie Highway. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6150 White Lake Rd, Clarkston MI 48346, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Becoming Clarkston (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Nelson Clark Home (approx. one mile away); Building Clarkston History (approx. one mile away); Sashabaw Cemetery (approx. 3.4 miles away); Sashabaw United Presbyterian Church (approx. 3.4 miles away); Kelley-Fisk Farm (approx. 5.1 miles away); White Lake Cemetery (approx. 5.8 miles away); Seymour Lake Methodist Episcopal Church (approx. 6.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clarkston.
 
Getting Here Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 26, 2021
2. Getting Here Marker
Inset photo (Lower right) caption: Bicycle travelers pause for refreshment at the spring in Depot Road in front of the cemetery gate, about 1900. The spring was a popular milestone for travelers in the area.
Getting Here Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 26, 2021
3. Getting Here Marker
Getting Here Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 26, 2021
4. Getting Here Marker
Inset photos (Lower left) caption: 1. The "witch's-hat" style depot was built about 1900, and it replaced the original 1850s depot that burned down. 2. The Deer Lake Inn was one of the area's most popular resorts of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Tourists visited the inn by train, or by car via Dixie Highway.
Getting Here Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 26, 2021
5. Getting Here Marker
Inset photo (Upper Left) caption: The first settlers in the early 1800s struggled through marshy terrain with no roads. Illustration by James Russell. All images, other than the 1817 township survey map, are courtesy of the Clarkston Community Historical Society.
Getting Here Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 26, 2021
6. Getting Here Marker
Inset photo (middle right) caption: On this portion of the 1872 township map, Dixie Highway and Depot Street are highlighted. At Circle 1 is downtown Clarkston, at circle 2 is the cemetery and the spring in the intersection of Depot and Deer Lake Roads, and at circle 3 is the train depot.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 4, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 1, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan. This page has been viewed 479 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 1, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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May. 27, 2024