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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Zeeland in Ottawa County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

New Groningen Cemetery / Groningen

 
 
New Groningen Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Garman, June 6, 2021
1. New Groningen Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
New Groningen Cemetery
New Groningen Cemetery is the only remnant of the dream of Jan Rabbers to establish Groningen, a commercial and industrial colony for Dutch immigrants who were not farmers. The log house and store owned by Rabbers and his wife, Cornelia, once stood on this site. In 1858, when the residents of Groningen relocated to the village of New Groningen about one mile northeast of here, the Rabberses sold the property to the churchyard association. Additional land purchases brought the cemetery to its present size. Most graves have simple headstones. Those of more prominent settlers can be identified by the large obelisks denoting family plots. Many of the oldest graves are unmarked, the wooden markers having deteriorated and disappeared.

Groningen
Established in 1847 as the commercial and industrial center of the Dutch colonies settled by immigrants in Ottawa County, Groningen began as a thriving village. Groningen’s founder, Jan Rabbers, was among the followers of Albertus Van Raalte who established the Holland settlement earlier that year. For his own community,
Groningen Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Garman, June 6, 2021
2. Groningen Marker
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Rabbers chose a site on the Black River, which he thought would became a major trade artery because of its location at the endpoint of a navigable waterway. He built a small log house and store on this site, a bridge over the river, and a lumber mill nearby. The promising village died when the bridge washed out in 1856 and a new one downstream diverted traffic to that area. Groningen’s citizens relocated their settlement to that site, which they called New Groningen.
 
Erected 2001 by Michigan Historical Commission - Michigan Historical Center. (Marker Number L2095.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Michigan Historical Commission series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1847.
 
Location. 42° 47.94′ N, 86° 2.732′ W. Marker is in Zeeland, Michigan, in Ottawa County. Marker is on 106th Avenue, 0.4 miles south of Business Interstate 196, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1650 106th Ave, Zeeland MI 49464, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Groningen / Jan Rabbers (approx. 0.7 miles away); Veneklasen Brick Company / Veneklasen Brick (approx. one mile away); The Van Raalte Farm
New Groningen Cemetery and Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Garman, June 6, 2021
3. New Groningen Cemetery and Historical Marker
(approx. 1.4 miles away); Zeeland Cemetery (approx. 1.7 miles away); First Reformed Church (approx. 1.8 miles away); Michigan's "Chick Center" (approx. 1.8 miles away); P. Henry De Pree / P. Henry De Pree House (approx. 2 miles away); Ebenezer Reformed Church (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Zeeland.
 
New Groningen Cemetery Sign and Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Garman, June 6, 2021
4. New Groningen Cemetery Sign and Historical Marker
With the cemetery in the background.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 23, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 22, 2021, by John Garman of Rochester Hills. This page has been viewed 88 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 22, 2021, by John Garman of Rochester Hills. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 29, 2022