Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dayton in Rhea County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

F.E. Robinson's Drug Store, Aqua Hotel, Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Scopes Trial Trail

 
 
F.E. Robinson's Drug Store, Aqua Hotel, Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 25, 2021
1. F.E. Robinson's Drug Store, Aqua Hotel, Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription.  This is the site of the drug store where the first local plans for the Scopes Trial were made by Robinson, George Rappleyea, and others. Next door on the west side was the Aqua Hotel, where the following trial participants roomed, ate, or conferred: Arthur Garfield Hays, Dudley Field Malone, Dr. John R. Neal, Judge John T. Raulston, Bryan, and Darrow. The former Cumberland Presbyterian Church across the street was built two years after the Scopes Trial. F. E. Robinson and Scopes juror Jess Goodrich were members of this church. Elsewhere, Bryan and Scopes attended churches in this denomination.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionEducationIndustry & CommerceLaw Enforcement. A significant historical year for this entry is 1925.
 
Location. 35° 29.577′ N, 85° 0.871′ W. Marker is in Dayton, Tennessee, in Rhea County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Market Street (Tennessee Route 378), on the right when traveling east on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 360 Main Street, Dayton TN 37321, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
distance of this marker. Bailey Hardware (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Morgan Furniture (about 600 feet away); Rhea County Veteran's Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rhea County Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); William Jennings Bryan (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Scopes Trial (approx. 0.2 miles away); McKenzie Law Office (approx. ¼ mile away); W.C. Bailey Boardinghouse (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dayton.
 
Also see . . .  The Scopes Monkey Trial was one of the greatest publicity stunts ever. By Phil Edwards in Vox, posted July 21, 2015. (Submitted on September 28, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
F.E. Robinson's Drug Store, Aqua Hotel, Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, September 25, 2021
2. F.E. Robinson's Drug Store, Aqua Hotel, Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker
Crowd at F.E. Robinson's drugstore image. Click for full size.
via Tennessee Virtual Archive, July 1925
3. Crowd at F.E. Robinson's drugstore
The store gained notoriety during the Scopes Trial, largely as a result of its owner's involvement (with others) in setting up the trial while sitting at a table inside. Crowds gathered outside the store to share the latest news and gossip about the trial and its participants. The store went out of business in 1982.
Scopes Trial leaders in Robinson's Drugstore image. Click for full size.
via Tennessee Virtual Archive, July 1925
4. Scopes Trial leaders in Robinson's Drugstore
Shown are George W. Rappelyea, Walter White, Clay Green, F.E. Robinson and Owen Wasson, among the men who orchestrated the celebrated trial. Robinson attempted to capitalize on the trial by advertising his drugstore as the place "where it started." John Scopes and town officials willingly posed for photographs seated around the store's soda fountain during the proceedings.
Clarence Darrow checks into Hotel Aqua image. Click for full size.
via Tennessee State Library & Archives
5. Clarence Darrow checks into Hotel Aqua
The famed lawyer defended Scopes during the trial. The woman shown is Nellie Kenyon, an early female reporter for the Chattanooga News. The newspaper merged with the Chattanooga Free Press in 1940 to create the Chattanooga News-Free Press, a precursor to today’s Chattanooga Times Free Press.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 28, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 508 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 28, 2021, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=182756

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 24, 2024