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River Edge in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historic New Bridge Landing

 
 
Historic New Bridge Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 21, 2021
1. Historic New Bridge Landing Marker
Inscription.  
Native American Settlement • Colonial Settlement • Battleground in The American Revolution • 20th Century Recreation • Historic Site


Historic New Bridge Landing Park
remarkably preserves a scenic fragment of the Jersey Dutch countryside, strategically situated at the narrows of the Hackensack River and famed for its compelling role in the American Revolution – indeed, we may confidently suggest this hallowed spot survived more of the American Revolution than any other place in America. Its distinctive antique dwellings, artifact collections, and leafy backwater landscapes are uniquely reminiscent of a vanished folk culture, dependent upon the tidal river as a commercial artery as well as a self-renewing source of nourishment and industrial power.

Cornelis and Beertje Matthyszen (1682), David and Hillegond Ackerman (by 1710), Lawrence Pieterse Van Buslirk (by 1738) and Jan and Annetje Zabriskie (by 1745) were some of the earliest colonial families to settle New Bridge. One and half mile north, at Old Bridge, were Demarests. The Zabriskies built a sandstone mansion
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here (Steuben House, 1752, enlarged 1767) in a Jersey Dutch building tradition. Approximately 190 Bergen County sandstone houses survive (most privately owned.)

By the time of the American Revolution, only one-third of the population of Bergen County could claim Netherlandish descent. Africans comprised one-fifth of the population; Germans were another fifth; while English, French, Scotch-Irish and Scandinavians comprised the remainder. Through intermarriage at the convenient adoption of a hybrid language rooted in Dutch, this varied stock blended to form the Jersey Dutch.
Text from Historian Kevin Wright’s book
The Bridge That Saved a Nation:
Bergen County, New Bridge and the Hackensack Valley.”

Come Home to History – Walk Where History Was Made

In 1710, David Ackerman described the area where the Steuben House now stands as “Tantewagh’s Plain.” This is a variant of the name of Tantaqua, the last great sachem of the Hackensacks.
People have lived at New Bridge for thousands of years

New Bridge served as a battleground, fort, encampment ground, military headquarters, and intelligence-gathering post in every year of the American Revolutionary War.

Enslaved and Indentured People
We have two records from New Bridge
An advertisement appeared in The
Historic New Bridge Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 21, 2021
2. Historic New Bridge Landing Marker
New-York Gazette, Revived in the Weekly-Post-Boy
on July 3, 1749, stating, “Run away on the 26th of June last, from Mr. John Zabriskie, at Hackensack, a Negro Man named Robin, about 20 Years of Age, and of a yellow Complexion; had on when he went away, a Linen jacket, short Trousers, and Leather Hat. This is, therefore, to forewarn all Masters of Vessels to take the said Fellow on board. And if any Person takes said Negro, and brings him to the Work House, they shall have Twenty Shillings Reward, and all reasonable Charges paid by John Zabriskie.”
On January 27, 1755, Jan Zabriskie placed an advertisement in the New-York Gazette, or The Weekly Post-Boy, seeking return of an indentured servant, Paulus Smith, aged 30 years, a miller by trade, who had escaped five days earlier. It reads “Absented from his Master’s Service on the Twenty Second Day at Night, a High Dutchman, named Paulus Smith, about 30 Years of age, of middle Stature, has brown bushy Hair. Had on when he went away, a Castor Hat, a whitish Cloth Coat, a Cloth Pair of Breeches, a brown Cloth Jacket, almost new, and speaks very short. He had other Cloaths with him. Whoever takes up and secures the said Servant, so that his Master may have him again, shall have forty Shillings reward, and all reasonable Charges paid by John Zabriskie, at Hackensack, East-Jersey. He is a Miller by Trade. If he comes back,
Historic New Bridge Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 21, 2021
3. Historic New Bridge Landing Marker
all faults will be forgive.”
Daguerreotype of a formally enslaved woman living in the family of James Paulison of New Bridge at the time of her death.
One of the last eye-witnesses of the American Revolution.

The Schedule of Events at the Museum Site Features:
• Walking Tours
• Historical Reenactments
• BCHS Collections & Exhibits
• Period Gardens
• Outkitchen Cooking
• Lectures in History
• Family-Friendly Activities
--------------------------------------------------
- Numbered Interpretive Signs throughout the HNBL park
- Grounds are open dawn to dusk
- Garbage: Carry in, Carry Out
- Dogs must be on a leach & remove waste
- No digging or metal detecting

BergenCountyHistory.org

< Sidebar: >
Battleground in the American Revolution
11 Engagements Took Place Here

Who was Steuben?

Major General Baron von Steuben is best remembered for organizing and training the Continental troops at Valley Forge. The State of New Jersey gifts the confiscated Zabriskie (Steuben) House to him in 1783. Steuben restores the war damaged house.

Who was Paine?
Thomas Paine “Our first object was to secure the bridge over the Hackensack, which laid up the river between the enemy and us . . . ”          The American Crisis, 1776         November
Steuben House at New Bridge Landing image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 21, 2021
4. Steuben House at New Bridge Landing
Reenacters at the Steuben House.
20, 1776


 
Erected 2021 by Bergen County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWar, US Revolutionary. A significant historical date for this entry is January 27, 1755.
 
Location. 40° 54.769′ N, 74° 1.997′ W. Marker is in River Edge, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Hackensack Avenue (County Route 503), on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: River Edge NJ 07661, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Historic New Bridge Landing (here, next to this marker); The Campbell – Christie House (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp Kitchen (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The (Von) Steuben House (about 600 feet away); Old Demarest House (about 600 feet away); Flax for Linen (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Historic New Bridge Landing (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Historic New Bridge Landing (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in River Edge.
 
More about this marker. The sidebar includes a map of Historic New Bridge Landing, indicating the locations of historic buildings, interpretive
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markers, and other sites of interest.
The bottom left of the marker contains a photograph with a caption of “The Bergen County Historical Society and Daughters of the American Revolution, William Paterson Chapter, visit the Steuben House in 1921 and began discussions to save the house. Also pictured: John Schwarzman and family, tenants of the house. (Bergen County Historical Society Collections)”
The Bergen County Historical Society began collecting artifacts and material culture at its founding in 1902.

A painting of a March 23, 1780 battle that was fought at New Bridge near the Steuben House appears at the upper right of the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 22, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 21, 2021, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 267 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 21, 2021, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Apr. 20, 2024