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Altha in Calhoun County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Richards Cemetery

 
 
Richards Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tim Fillmon, August 1, 2013
1. Richards Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  On this site are the remains of early area settlers, the Richards family. As a prominent Virginia Colonial family, George Richards (1727-1818) was with Washington at Braddocks Defeat (1755), and with his sons in the Revolutionary War (1776). The family served in the War of 1812, Florida Indian Wars and Richards Company of Friendly Indians, settling Ocheese Bluffs, Wewahitchka, and Altha. As one of Floridas first pioneer families and Interpreters for Andrew Jackson for Florida treaties, they built Fort Richards where Georges son Thomas C. Richards (1774-1838) was killed during an Indian attack. Thomass son, Rev. John G. Richards (1797-1876), built the church and named Wewahitchka, and served as Calhoun County Elections Inspector (1843), Clerk of the Court (1851) and in Company A 2nd Florida Calvary. His son, Daniel Thomas Richards (1825-1879), buried at this site, survived the forts attack and built Moss Hill, Chipola Baptist and Altha Methodist Churches. He was a Civil War Veteran (6th Florida Infantry Regiment Company G wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia in 1863) and Washington County Clerk of Court. His wife, brother, a son, and other family
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are buried here. Son Martin L. Richards (1866-1947) founded Altha.
 
Erected 2003 by The Peacock, Tate, Demaria, Richards, and Harrell Families and the Florida Department of State. (Marker Number F-482.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian. A significant historical year for this entry is 1812.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 30° 33.89′ N, 85° 8.91′ W. Marker was in Altha, Florida, in Calhoun County. Marker was on Chipola Street (County Route 274) 1.3 miles west of North Main Street (Florida Route 71), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Altha FL 32421, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Altha Methodist Church (approx. 1.3 miles away); Governor Fuller Warren (approx. 8.6 miles away); M & B Railroad (approx. 10.3 miles away); Cochranetown - Corakko Talofv (approx. 10˝ miles away); Blunt Reservation and Fields (approx. 10˝ miles away); Calhoun County War Memorial (approx. 10.6 miles
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away); Apalachicola Tribal Town Mekko John Blount (approx. 10.6 miles away); "Old Blountstown" Courthouse (approx. 11.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This area was significantly damaged by Hurricane Michael in October 2018, and deforested by high speed winds. All that remains of the marker is a post.
 
Regarding Richards Cemetery. Marker missing. All that remains is a post. May have been taken out by Hurricane Michael in 2018.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 19, 2021, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. This page has been viewed 463 times since then and 116 times this year. Last updated on November 25, 2021, by Christopher Kimball of Tallahassee, Florida. Photo   1. submitted on February 19, 2021, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 24, 2024