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Montrose in Montrose County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Ute Way of Life

Living in Harmony with Nature

 
 
The Ute Way of Life Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 9, 2021
1. The Ute Way of Life Marker
Inscription.  They called themselves "Nuche," meaning "the people." The Ute Indian people lived in a land of diversity - from dry desert-scrub to verdant river valleys, from dense forests to high mountain meadows. To survive, they had to know where to find plants and animals, when to gather them, and what to use them for.

They used plants for food, medicine, and for healing and religious ceremonies. They made everyday objects - baskets, sandals, arrows, cradleboards - all or in part from plant materials. As some Ute groups began acquiring horses in the 17th century, they started moving their camps more. Now, they could find plants and animals at certain times and elevations.

While the Ute people no longer live here, their spirit and the beauty of this place endure. Enjoy this Native Garden, but do so carefully, so others can enjoy it too.

Captions
Middle Left: Buckskin Charlie's Wife, Emma
Lower Left: Willow water jug

 
Erected by History Colorado and Ute Indian Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists:
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AnimalsEnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryNative Americans.
 
Location. 38° 26.134′ N, 107° 52.061′ W. Marker is in Montrose, Colorado, in Montrose County. Marker is at the intersection of Chipeta Road and U.S. 550, on the right when traveling north on Chipeta Road. The marker is located on the northern section of the Ute Indian Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 17253 Chipeta Road, Montrose CO 81403, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. So Bold, So Beautiful a Land (a few steps from this marker); Building An Empire: The Spanish Frontier (a few steps from this marker); In Behalf of the Light (a few steps from this marker); Pageant in the Wilderness (a few steps from this marker); The Dominguez-Escalante Expedition / Dominguez-Escalante Country (within shouting distance of this marker); The Utes / Uncompahgre River Country / Ouray (1833-1880) / Chipeta (1843-1924) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Hangin' Tree
The Ute Way of Life Marker in a native garden by the Ute Indian Museum image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 9, 2021
2. The Ute Way of Life Marker in a native garden by the Ute Indian Museum
(approx. ¼ mile away); Early Irrigation in the Uncompahgre Valley (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montrose.
 
Also see . . .  Ute people.
Ute (/juːt/) are the Indigenous people of the Ute tribe and culture among the Indigenous peoples of the Great Basin. They had lived in sovereignty in the regions of present-day Utah and Colorado in the Southwestern United States for many centuries until European settlers colonized their lands. The state of Utah is named after the Ute tribe. Source: Wikipedia
(Submitted on November 28, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The Ute Way of Life Marker is on the left of the other markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 9, 2021
3. The Ute Way of Life Marker is on the left of the other markers
Ute people - Chief Sevara and family image. Click for full size.
Public Domain - Detroit Publishing Co., circa 1899
4. Ute people - Chief Sevara and family
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 28, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 215 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 28, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 17, 2024