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Delaware City in New Castle County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Small But Mighty

 
 
Small But Mighty Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, May 31, 2021
1. Small But Mighty Marker
Inscription.  
They seem scary to many people, but a world without bats is scarier. Bats eat millions of flying pests each night, helping to control mosquitos and moths and saving farmers billions of dollars in pesticides.

White-Nose Syndrome [WNS] Threatened Bat Populations
WNS is a disease causing mass die-offs of bats at hibernation sites, including Fort Delaware. The disease was first detected in the United States in 2006 and killed millions of bats in the first 7 years. Bats affected by WNS have been detected in 33 U.S. states and seven Canada provinces as of 2019, and the disease continues to spread at an alarming rate.

WNS is caused by a fungal pathogen called Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which grows in cold, dark, and damp places. Pd erodes the bat's skin tissue and causes more frequent arousal during hibernation; resulting in cellular disruptions, dehydration, starvation, and often death.

The Spread of White-Nose Syndrome
WNS First Detected in US 2006
WNS Confirmed
WNS Suspected
Data courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Bats
Small But Mighty Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, May 31, 2021
2. Small But Mighty Marker
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spread the disease, but so can we, and we can take it much farther than bats can. It's easy to help reduce the spread of WNS. In places where bats hibernate:

• Be careful not to rub or touch the walls so you don't pick up the microscopic spores

• Avoid taking the same clothing or personal items from one hibernation site to another

• Follow the directions of on-site staff

What Does WNS Look Like?
Infected bats may have a white growth on their snouts, ears or wings, or may exhibit unusual behavior. However, sometimes they show no visibile signs, and laboratory tests are needed to detect the fungus.
A tri-colored bat with WNS
A northem long-eared bat with WNS, but no visible signs
A little brown bat with wing damage from WNS

US Fish & Wildlife Service
Delaware Division Fish & Wildlife
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control
 
Erected by Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior; Delaware Division Fish & Wildlife; Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsScience & Medicine. A significant historical year for this entry is 2006.
 
Location. 39° 34.757′ N, 75° 35.223′ W.
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Marker is in Delaware City, Delaware, in New Castle County. Marker is at the intersection of Clinton Street and Harbor Street, on the right when traveling north on Clinton Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 30 Clinton St, Delaware City DE 19706, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Waterfront at Delaware City (within shouting distance of this marker); Sailing on the C&D Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Coastal Defense Forts (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lock at Delaware City (within shouting distance of this marker); The Diving Bell (within shouting distance of this marker); City of Delaware City Veteran's Point (within shouting distance of this marker); Heronry on Pea Patch Island (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Building the C&D Canal (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Delaware City.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 17, 2022. It was originally submitted on June 2, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 80 times since then and 52 times this year. Last updated on January 17, 2022, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 2, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Aug. 16, 2022