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Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Daggett's Crossing

 
 
Daggett's Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By QuesterMark
1. Daggett's Crossing Marker
Inscription.  

Among the early settlers of Fort Worth, Charles Biggers (C.B.) Daggett (1812-1888) was born in Canada and moved to Indiana when he was eight years old. Around 1839–40, His family moved to Shelby County, Texas, where they participated in the Regulator–Moderator War. C.B. Daggett then fought in the U.S.-Mexico War. For his military service, he received a 320-acre land grant in Tarrant County which became the C.B. Daggett Survey.

On his land situated north of the West Fork of the Trinity, Daggett farmed with his sons and maintained a small herd of cattle. Daggett and his sons also operated a ferry across the West Fork, near present-day Samuels Avenue and Cold Springs Road. It was one of only two across the river at the time, with the other being Eagle Ford Ferry in Dallas County. Local boosters claimed that Daggett's Ferry was superior, causing hundreds of immigrants and trail drivers in the late 1860s and early 1870s to bypass Dallas in favor of the Fort Worth crossing. C.B. Daggett reported that more than 40,000 cattle passed through annually during the 1870s.

The operation of the ferry was carefully choreographed
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with teams of mules positioned on opposite riverbanks. Once the cargo or passengers were loaded on the ferry raft, ropes were thrown across the river to the mule skinner on the other side to then pull the ferry across, an entertaining sight according to reports. The ferry operated until 1877, when a bridge was built nearby to serve the community and region. Daggett's Crossing is remembered for its significance and heritage in the area's settlement, transportation and commerce.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2019 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 22637.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Roads & Vehicles.
 
Location. 32° 46.927′ N, 97° 19.578′ W. Marker is in Fort Worth, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker can be reached from East Northside Drive north of Cold Springs Road, on the right when traveling north. The marker is located on the Trinity Trails paved walking/biking path, east of Northside Drive Bridge on the south bank of the West Fork of the Trinity River. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Worth TX 76102, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Racial Terror Lynching in America / Racial Terror Lynching of Mr. Fred Rouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); Garvey-Veihl House
Daggett's Crossing Marker context image. Click for full size.
Photographed By QuesterMark, January 22, 2022
2. Daggett's Crossing Marker context
The Trinity river is just beyond the marker.
(approx. one mile away); Tarrant County War Memorial "Spirit of the American Doughboy" (approx. one mile away); Robert David Law (approx. 1.1 miles away); Douglass and McGar Parks (approx. 1.1 miles away); Swift & Company (approx. 1.1 miles away); Armour and Swift Plaza (approx. 1.1 miles away); Armour & Company (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Worth.
 
View of the Trinity River looking around the Daggett's Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By QuesterMark, January 22, 2022
3. View of the Trinity River looking around the Daggett's Crossing Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2022. It was originally submitted on January 23, 2022, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 613 times since then and 153 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 23, 2022, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 23, 2024