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Fort Sill in Comanche County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Quartermaster Granary

 
 
Quartermaster Granary Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 9, 2021
1. Quartermaster Granary Marker
Inscription.  While the actual construction date of this building is unclear, it was being used by the quartermaster for the storage of grain in 1902. The 30'x80' wood frame structure with a full-length, limestone basement is unlike the other buildings erected in the 1870's. By 1900, many of the older buildings were being reroofed with sheet metal instead of the original wood shingles. The granary was apparently roofed for the first time with sheet metal.

In the 1870's, a civilian employee was frequently hired by the quartermaster to be "in charge of the public forage" for a monthly salary of $67. His duties included arranging for the purchase, transportation, and distribution of corn, oats, hay, and other sustenance to feed the livestock. Hay and firewood were stored within a large fenced area west of the stone corral below the hill.

After the Apache prisoners of war arrived on post in 1894, many of these former warriors were actively engaged in farming and ranching. These hardworking individuals produced enough Kafir corn and hay to meet their own requirements and provide large surpluses to the army at the same time. This continued
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until their formal release in 1913.

Beginning in the early 1920's, the demands of a mechanized army, rather than one dependent on horses, brought more changes to the post. The old granary was converted to an ordnance shop office, a function which continued until after World War II.

Captions
Upper Left: Floorplans for Quartermaster Granary
Lower Right: Apache P.O.W.s baling hay on Fort Sill in 1904.
 
Erected by Fort Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsForts and CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical year for this entry is 1902.
 
Location. 34° 40.107′ N, 98° 23.152′ W. Marker is in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in Comanche County. Marker is at the intersection of Fowler Street and Randolph Road, on the right when traveling south on Fowler Street. The marker is located south of the first row of buildings by the water tower. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Sill OK 73503, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Commissary Storehouse (a few steps from this marker); Quartermaster Warehouse (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Commissary Storehouse
The Quartermaster Granary and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 9, 2021
2. The Quartermaster Granary and Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Band Quarters (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Headquarters - School of Fire for Field Artillery (about 400 feet away); Infantry Company Quarters (about 400 feet away); Officers' Quarters (about 500 feet away); Post Headquarters (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Sill.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located in the Old Post Museum area of Fort Sill, an active U.S. military installation. The museum is open to the public, but appropriate identification is required for access for Fort Sill.
 
The view of the Quartermaster Granary and Marker from the parking lot image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 9, 2021
3. The view of the Quartermaster Granary and Marker from the parking lot
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 24, 2022. It was originally submitted on January 24, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 75 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 24, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 17, 2024